Modernist interpretations

  • Created by: Elmo
  • Created on: 12-05-17 14:22
Malcolm Bradbury
"We have noted that few ages have been more multiple more promiscuous in artistic style"
1 of 31
Philip Rahv
"Naturalism exhausted itself in taking an inventory of the world while it was still relatively stable... it could not possibly do justice to the phenomena of its disruption"
2 of 31
Graham Martine
"Waugh represents the pre-war period in a peculiar way. His novels do not provide insights into the special aspect of his time that he knows, but they recognise its symptoms...his feeling towards it is one of half-fascinated, half-indulgent horror"
3 of 31
E.M Forster
"I cannot shut myself up in a Palace of Art or a Philosophic Tower and ignore the madness and misery of the world"
4 of 31
Virginia Woolf
"Let us not take it for granted that life exists more fully in what is commonly thought big than is what is commonly thought small"
5 of 31
Alain De Botton (on modernist writers)
"there were no such things as minor observations"
6 of 31
T.S. Eliot
"[modernism is] way of controlling, of ordering, of giving shape and significance to the immense panorama of futility and anarchy which [was] contemporary history"
7 of 31
G.H Bantcock
"The temper of the age was anti-heroic... the reaction of the post-1918 world was to suspect too easily all manifestations of authority"
8 of 31
John Fletcher
"Joyce's and Woolf"s works constitute a total universe and sustain themselves within the completeness of their own vision"
9 of 31
Roger Luckhurst
"The technology with the most impact on early 20th century modernism is undoubtedly cinema... the new grammar of close-ups, jumps cuts and flashbacks echoed the patterns of human consciousness"
10 of 31
Franz Kafka
"In the struggle between yourself and the world you must take the side of the world"
11 of 31
Franz Kuna (on Kafka)
"...for him, life was balanced as on a razor-edge between a moral imperative, affirming the world we live in, and an irrepressible spiritual urge to transcend this world."
12 of 31
Maggie Gee
"Woolf's novels are full of sensuous touches... and the sounds of her words can be like velvet on the page"
13 of 31
Claire Tamalin (on Mansfield)
"The remaining stories cluster around one theme, which is the fragility of the young as they prepare to enjoy life"
14 of 31
Richard Wasson (on Waugh)
"Most of the recent criticism of Waugh's early novels has stressed the role of the narrator, who is seen as relating the action in a detached, objective, and neutral manner"
15 of 31
Howard Jacobson
"It is impossible to escape the conclusion that the longing for newness or change that pervades the novel is a response to the ruination of war"
16 of 31
Virginia Woolf
"the point of interest, lies very likely in the dark places of psychology"
17 of 31
James Joyce
"The actions of men are the best interpreters of their thoughts"
18 of 31
Virginia Woolf
"the emphasis is upon something hitherto ignored... as the eyes accustom themselves to twilight... we see how complete the story is"
19 of 31
Katherine Mansfield
"Could we change our attitude we should not only see life differently, but life itself would come to be different"
20 of 31
Virginia Woolf
"Rhythm goes far deeper than words. A sight. An emotion creates this wave in the mind, long before it makes words to fit in"
21 of 31
Elizabeth Abel (on Woolf)
"Woolf's readers must learn to detect, beneath the flux of consciousness she substituted for realist narrative, fictions that tie the present to the past"
22 of 31
Virginia Woolf
"Human beings have neither kindness, not faith, nor charity beyond what serves to increase the pleasure of the moment"
23 of 31
Evelyn Waugh
"These young people have such an intelligent knowledgeable surface, and then the crust suddenly breaks and you look down into the depths of confusion you didn't know existed"
24 of 31
Chris Bond (on Waugh)
"seeks to expose the failings of the apparently carefree culture sweeping across... British society after [WW1], the brittle world of the 'bright young things',... their self-indulgent lifestyle and rejection of traditional responsibilities"
25 of 31
George Orwell
"I underwent poverty and the sense of failure. This increased my natural hatred of authority and made me for the first time fully aware of the existence of the working classes"
26 of 31
Unknown (on Mansfield)
"Widely regarded as a pioneer of the form, Mansfield focussed on capturing the psychology and inner lives of characters through free indirect discourse and ‘epiphanies’"
27 of 31
Unknown (on Joyce)
"James Joyce strives to achieve a kind of realism unlike that of any novel before it by rendering the thoughts and actions of its main characters as memories actually appear in our minds - trivial and significant at once"
28 of 31
Franz Kafka
"Alienation must occur before we can have realisation"
29 of 31
Virginia Woolf
"contemplation was unendurable, the mirror was broken"
30 of 31
Evelyn Waugh
"All over England, people were walking up, queasy and despondent"
31 of 31

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

"Naturalism exhausted itself in taking an inventory of the world while it was still relatively stable... it could not possibly do justice to the phenomena of its disruption"

Back

Philip Rahv

Card 3

Front

"Waugh represents the pre-war period in a peculiar way. His novels do not provide insights into the special aspect of his time that he knows, but they recognise its symptoms...his feeling towards it is one of half-fascinated, half-indulgent horror"

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

"I cannot shut myself up in a Palace of Art or a Philosophic Tower and ignore the madness and misery of the world"

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

"Let us not take it for granted that life exists more fully in what is commonly thought big than is what is commonly thought small"

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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