Mitosis

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Interphase
The cell prepares itself for division by doubling all of its organelles and chromosomes and expands.
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Prophase
The duplicated chromosomes become condensed and more tightly wound. Mitotic spindles made of proteins called microtubles form on the edge and elongate the cell.
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Prometaphase
The membrane around the nucleus (called the nuclear envelope) breaks down so that the condensed chromosomes touch the microtubles of the mitotic spindles.
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Metaphase
The pairs of chromosomes line up in the middle (the equator) of the cell.
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Anaphase
pairs of chromosomes (also called sister chromatids) are drawn to opposite sides of the cell so that there is a copy of the cell's DNA at either side of the cell. The mitotic spindles get shorter to begin to allow the cell to divide.
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Telophase
Nuclear envelopes start to form around the separate pairs of sister chromatids to form a pair of nuclei. The cell has almost separated.
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Cytokinesis in animal cells
A fiber ring in the middle of the cell, containing a protien called actin, contracts and pulls the cell membrane towards the center in order to squeeze the two new daughter cells apart.
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Cytokinesis in plant cells
A cell plate takes the place of the meta plate and grows between the two new cells. Then it becomes a membrane that instills itself into the cell wall of each of the daughter cells.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

The duplicated chromosomes become condensed and more tightly wound. Mitotic spindles made of proteins called microtubles form on the edge and elongate the cell.

Back

Prophase

Card 3

Front

The membrane around the nucleus (called the nuclear envelope) breaks down so that the condensed chromosomes touch the microtubles of the mitotic spindles.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

The pairs of chromosomes line up in the middle (the equator) of the cell.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

pairs of chromosomes (also called sister chromatids) are drawn to opposite sides of the cell so that there is a copy of the cell's DNA at either side of the cell. The mitotic spindles get shorter to begin to allow the cell to divide.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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