Mid-Tudor Crisis + Elizabeth I Key Words

  • Created by: Chlouija
  • Created on: 02-06-18 18:03
ABDICATE
Give up the throne.
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ADIAPHORA
Religious topics that re not forbidden or commanded in the scriptures. Sometimes described as 'things indifferent'.
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ANOINTED
The granting of holy office to a monarch by rubbing on holy oil.
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BLACK DEATH
Bubonic plague carried by fleas on rats that reached England from Europe and Asia in 1348, and killed about 1/3 of the population.
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BOOK OF HOMILIES
A series of written sermons that the clergy could read out instead of writing their own.
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BOOK OF ORDERS
Instruction issued to Justices of the Peace giving guidance on how to deal with issues such as food shortages.
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BOROUGHS
A town which had been granted a royal charter, meaning it ran its own affairs and could send representatives to parliament.
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BULLION SUPPLIES
Supplies of gold and silver.
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CALVINISM
The beliefs of the French theologian, John Calvin. He was a radical Protestant and believed in the concept of predestination.
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CHALICES
The goblet or cup that holds the wine at communion.
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CHANTRIES
Small chapels where prayers for the dead were said to reduce their time in purgatory.
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CLASSIS MOVEMENT
Meetings started by Puritan ministers to discuss matters of common interest. It was not a national movement, but local groups were in touch with one another.
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COURT OF HIGH COMMISSION
The highest church court.
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DEBASEMENT
The reduction in the amount of silver content in the coins.
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DEPRIVED
Priests who, because of their beliefs or because they had married under Edward's reign, lost their benefices under Mary.
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DEVISE
A document which attempted to set out the order of succession following Edward's death.
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DISSOLUTION OF THE MONASTERIES
Term used to describe the closure of all England's monasteries which took place between 1536 and 1540.
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DRY STAMP
A copy of the royal signature which could be printed on documents and inked over. It was used at the end of Henry VIII's reign when he was ill, without his knowledge, and gave Somerset great powers.
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ENCLOSURE
Landowners put hedges around their fields, often changing land sue from crops (arable) to sheep farming (pasture).
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ENCLOSURE COMMISSION
A body set up by Somerset, led by Hales, to investigate the legality of recent enclosures. It encouraged peasants to believe the government supported their claims and resulted in some enclosures being torn down.
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EXCHEQUER
The centre of financial administration. It received money, stored it and paid it out as well as auditing the crown's accounts.
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FOLDCOURSE SYSTEM
A system by which sheep and cattle are allowed on to land, where crops are grown, in order to fertilise it.
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GLORIANA
A cult which portrayed Elizabeth as the Virgin Queen who had restored the true religion, harmony and progress to the country. They used mythical and religious symbols.
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GOLDEN SPEECH
A speech given by Elizabeth I to her final parliament in 1601 in which she talked about her love for her subjects.
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HANSEATIC LEAGUE
A group of Baltic and German trading towns who imported/exported goods in Europe. Their main base was in London and they gained considerable privileges.
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HERESY LAWS
Laws that punish those who reject the religion of the state.
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HOLY DAYS
A day on which a religious observance is held, usually the feast day of a saint of a major religious festival.
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HOST
The raising of consecrated bread during communion so that the congregation could see it.
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HOUSES OF CORRECTION
Established as places to punish those guilty of minor offences through hard work, the first being in Bridewell, London.
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HUMANISTS
Scholars who supported the rediscovery of classical ideas and works and applied them to 16th century. They stressed the uniqueness of man.
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ICONOCLASTIC ATTACKS
The smashing up of religious images, strained glass windows and statutes.
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JPS
Local government officers' responsibility for maintaining order and implementing legislation in their country.
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MONOPOLIES
The sole right to manufacture or sell a product.
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ORDINAL
Details of the ceremony to be followed when priests are to be ordained.
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PAPAL BULL
Edict issued by papacy.
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PAPAL LEGATE
A representative of the Pope who has been given papal powers.
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PLURALISM
The practice of clergymen holding more than one parish.
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PRESENCE CHAMBER
The room where the monarch gave audiences to foreign ambassadors and other dignitaries.
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PRIVY CHAMBER
The private chambers of the monarch. During Elizabeth's reign, it was staffed by women.
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PROROGUED
A monarch had the right to suspend a parliamentary session until further notice.
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PURGATORY
A place between Heaven and Hell.
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RECOINAGE
The issuing of new coinage, usually to try to restore confidence after debasement.
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RECUSANCY FINES
The fine given to those Catholics who did not attend church.
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REGENCY COUNCIL
A group of ministers, usually of nobles and landed gentry, who rule on behalf of the king until he came of age.
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ROYAL INJUNCTIONS
A law issued by the crown to compel the clergy to follow a certain practice.
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ROYAL PREROGATIVE
Rights held by the monarch, which included the ability to issue proclamations, enforce the royal will and suspend parliamentary acts.
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SALIC LAW
An 11th century law from France which excluded women from succeeding to the throne.
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SECTARIES
Another name for separatists who believed in the right of each congregation to worship as it chose.
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SEMINARIES
Training college for Roman Catholic priests.
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ST BARTHOLOMEW'S DAY MASSACRE
August 1572: French Protestants killed at Henry IV's wedding in Paris, seen as the start of a campaign to wipe out Protestantism in Europe.
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SURPLICE
White tunic worn by Catholic clergy, except when saying mass when they wore a cope.
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SYNOD
The assembly of the clergy of a diocese or of the whole church.
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TRANSUBSTANTIATION
The belief that during communion the bread and wine are transformed into the body and blood of Christ without any apparent outward change.
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VESTMENTS
The religious clothes worn by clergy.
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VETO
The monarch had the right to veto or reject an Act of Parliament.
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VISITATION
An inspection by a bishop or archbishop to look into clerical standards and the state of church buildings.
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WARS OF THE ROSES
1455-1485: Wars between the two royal of Lancaster and York, ended with Henry Vii's victory in Bosworth.
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XENOPHOBIA
A hatred or dislike of foreigners.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Religious topics that re not forbidden or commanded in the scriptures. Sometimes described as 'things indifferent'.

Back

ADIAPHORA

Card 3

Front

The granting of holy office to a monarch by rubbing on holy oil.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Bubonic plague carried by fleas on rats that reached England from Europe and Asia in 1348, and killed about 1/3 of the population.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

A series of written sermons that the clergy could read out instead of writing their own.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

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