Memory Key Concepts

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  • Created by: HarveyCB
  • Created on: 10-10-18 13:24
What is memory
The ability to retain knowledge
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What are the stages of information processing, in order
Input, encoding, storage, retrieval and output
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What is input
Information entering the memory from the environment
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What is encoding
Sensory information being changed so we can make sense of it
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What is storage
When information is saved to use at a later time
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What is retrieval
When information is recovered from storage
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What is output
When the retrieved information is used
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What are the different types of forgetting
Decay and displacement
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What is decay
The fading of information which is not paid attention to
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What is displacement
When information in the short term memory is pushed out by new information once the store is full
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What is retrieval failure
The inability to remember something because the cue needed to trigger the memory is not present
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What are the two different types of cues
Context and State
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What is a context cue
An external cue, from the environment
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What is a state cue
An internal cue, from your own mind
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Give an example of a state cue
When you are in the same emotional state as when the memory was encoded it can act as a trigger
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What is amnesia
The temporary or permanent loss of memory, due to a physical or psychological factor
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What can cause amnesia
Traumatising or emotional events (like giving birth)
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What are the two types of amnesia
Anterograde and retrograde
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What is anterograde amnesia
The inability to learn new information after the damage occurred
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What is retrograde amnesia
The loss of memory before the damage occurred
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What are the three regions of the brain relevant to memory
Hippocampus, frontal lobe and cerebellum
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Describe the hippocampus
Horseshoe shaped, part of the limbic system, involved in making new semantic and autobiographical memories
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Why is the hippocampus important for semantic and autobiographical memories
Memories must pass through the hippocampus to enter the long term memory store (LTM)
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What happens when the hippocampus is damaged and why
It causes anterograde amnesia, as the memories cannot enter the long term memory store
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Describe the frontal lobe
It is known as the 'control centre', as its responsible for planning, organisation and judgement making. Where memory is stored
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What happens when the frontal lobe is damaged and why
It causes retrograde amnesia, as memories are not being stored
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Describe the cerebellum
Back of the brain, responsible for semantic and procedural memories, for learning sequences of movement and our motor control
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What happens when the cerebellum is damaged
People cant learn new skills or improve old ones, and complex movements are difficult
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What are the stages of information processing, in order

Back

Input, encoding, storage, retrieval and output

Card 3

Front

What is input

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What is encoding

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What is storage

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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