macbeth usefull

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  • Created by: Oscar
  • Created on: 08-04-18 14:00
'Fair is foul, All three witches - Act 1.1 Analysis:
and foul is fair' The gothic use of oppisition can be seen here, which just really highlights the supernatural and gothic elements of the witches. It is also foreshadowing Macbeth's later line t
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'O valiant cousin!..... Duncan about Macbeth - Act 1.2 Analysis:
worthy gentleman!' shows the family type relationship between Duncan and Macbeth and Duncans admiration for him
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So foul and.... Macbeth to Banquo - Act 1.3 Analysis:
fair a day I have seen.' This allows the audience knowledge that Macbeth and this witches are to be affiliated with eachother throughout the play. It also uses the gothic method of doubles and mirroring, as Macbeth repeats what has already been said.
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'What, can the ........' Banquo, after hearing of Macbeth's title Thane of Cawdor - Act 1.3 Analysis:
devil speak true? Banquo is shown to be the antithesis to Macbeth, Godly and honest, so his excalmation that the witches' and their prophecy are in fact 'the devil' shows that they are negative. By also describing Macbeth's gain of the title as some
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'I fear thy nature/It is too full ....... Lady Macbeth on Macbeth - Act 1.5 Analysis:
o'th'milk of human kindness.' Lady Macbeth comes across very authorative in the initial representation of her character. This is the first of many times that she ridicules and emasculates Macbeth, and here, the notion of 'human kindess'
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......on mortal thoughts, unsex me here.' Lady Macbeth - Act 1.5 Analysis:
'Come you spirits/That tend.....Lady Macbeth quick aligns herself with the evil and supernatural, which shows to the audience that she is malicious. To a Jacobean audience, her rejection of her femininity would have been seen as quite shocking, but i
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'vaulting ambition which o'erleaps itself/And falls on th'other.' Macbeth's soliloquy - Act 1.7
Here, Macbeth admits that although he knows it is morally wrong to kill Duncan, due to the fact he is his cousin, kingsman and host, it is his own selfish desires that make him want to gain the title of King. He is an over-reacher, which is often use
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'have pluck'd my ****** from his boneless gums/And dash'd the brains out.' Lady Macbeth - Act 1.7
To a modern and Jacobean audience the explicit threat of violence towards a child is shocking and proves Lady Macbeth to be a 'fiend-like queen.' It shows her to be a non-maternal character and supports the idea that she wishes she was a male so that
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'Hear it not, Duncan, for it is a knell/That summons thee to heaven or to hell.' Macbeth - Act 2.1
The rhyme here shows Macbeth's final decision and adds melodrama to the scene. The religious notion would have furthered a Jacobean audience's angst towards Macbeth, as regicide was seen as a crime against God, as God was believed to have divinely ch
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'My hands are of your colour, but I shame/To wear a heart so white.' Lady Macbeth to Macbeth - Act 2.2
Here, Lady Macbeth emasculates Macbeth by showing him to be weak and faint hearted. She refers to him as 'white' meaning bloodless, giving the director of the play that at this point in the play Macbeth is looking a little worse for ware. She portray
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

'O valiant cousin!..... Duncan about Macbeth - Act 1.2 Analysis:

Back

worthy gentleman!' shows the family type relationship between Duncan and Macbeth and Duncans admiration for him

Card 3

Front

So foul and.... Macbeth to Banquo - Act 1.3 Analysis:

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

'What, can the ........' Banquo, after hearing of Macbeth's title Thane of Cawdor - Act 1.3 Analysis:

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

'I fear thy nature/It is too full ....... Lady Macbeth on Macbeth - Act 1.5 Analysis:

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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