Macbeth Quotes

(1,1)-Introduces the theme of deception/Appearance vs reality.
"Fair is foul, and foul is fair"
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(1,2)-Key example of Macbeth's brutal and potentially heroic actions in battle.
"Til he unseamed him from the nave to th'chaps / And fixed his head upon our battlements"
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(1,2)-Ironic-shows Duncan's pride to be related to Macbeth.
"O valiant cousin, worthy gentleman"
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(1,2)-Duncan announces Macbeth's new title (not explicitly).
"Go pronounce his present death/And with his former title greet Macbeth"
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(1,3)-Macbeth mirrors the witches’ words-The first time we meet Macbeth.
"So foul and fair a day I have not seen"
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(1,3)-Banquo is in full disbelief of the witches and is sure of their supernaturality.
"What, can the Devil speak true?"
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(1,3)-Macbeth outlines his role and shows his belief in the prophesies.
"Glamis, and Thane of Cawdor: The greatest is behind"
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(1,4)-Macbeth is using 'dark forces' to mask his ambition-Introduces the theme of obscurity.
"Stars, hide your fires;/ Let not light see my black and deep desires"
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(1,5)-Lady Macbeth is openly criticising Macbeth's masculinity.
"I do fear thy nature: It is too full of the milk of human kindness"
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(1,5)-Lady Macbeth is willing herself to evil spirits-Association with the supernatural-Asking for masculinity.
"Come, you spirits/ That tend of mortal thoughts, unsex me here/ And fill me crown to the toe, top-full/ Of direst cruelty"
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(1,5)-Another key part of Lady Macbeth's soliloquy-Continues the theme of deceit/Appearance vs reality
"Look like th'innocent flower but be the serpent under't"
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(1,7)-Macbeth recognises his 'fatal flaw'-Ambition that may lead to his downfall.
"Vaulting ambition, which overleaps itself and falls on the other"
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(1,7)-A example of Lady Macbeth's 'masculinity'/Violent nature-An attempt to encourage Macbeth to murder Duncan.
"I would have plucked my ****** from its boneless gums,/ And dashed the brains out, had I so sworn as you/ Have done to this"
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(1,7)-Theme of deception/Appearance vs reality.
"False face must hide what the false heart doth know"
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(2,1)-Banquo is confirming his allegiance to Macbeth-Showing he is morally opposite to Macbeth.
"My bosom franchised and allegiance clear"
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(2,1)-Macbeth questions the appearance of the dagger-Is he already being driven to madness?-Potentially sent by the witches.
"Or art thou but/ A dagger of the mind, a false creation proceeding from the heat oppressed brain"
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(2,1)-Shows Macbeth had already decided to murder Duncan.
"Thou marshall'st me the way I was going,/ And such an instrument I was to use"
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(2,1)-A part of a rhyming couplet-We know the guilt will live on-Ironic.
"I go and it is done"
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(2,2)-Hints towards Lady Macbeth’s less harsh side-Hints she has a conscience.
"Had he not resembled/My father as he slept, I had done't"
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(2,2)-Lady Macbeth criticises Macbeth-Takes control-Imperative "give" emphasises her dominance over Macbeth.
"Infirm of purpose! Give me the daggers"
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(2,2)-Introduces the motif of sleep-Shows that Macbeth is full of guilt.
"Glamis has murdered sleep, and therefore Cawdor/ Shall sleep no more"
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(2,2)-Ironic-Their actions were severe-No amount of water will wash away their sins.
"A little water clears us of this deed./ How easy is is then"
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(2,3)-Porter-Man 1
"Here's a farmer that hanged himself on th'ex/pectation of pleanty"
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

(1,2)-Key example of Macbeth's brutal and potentially heroic actions in battle.

Back

"Til he unseamed him from the nave to th'chaps / And fixed his head upon our battlements"

Card 3

Front

(1,2)-Ironic-shows Duncan's pride to be related to Macbeth.

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

(1,2)-Duncan announces Macbeth's new title (not explicitly).

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

(1,3)-Macbeth mirrors the witches’ words-The first time we meet Macbeth.

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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