Loftus and Palmer- Aims and context

HideShow resource information
What were Loftus' aims?
1) To find out the effect leading questions (altering 1 word) have on estimation of speed. 2) To find out if a leading question just alters your response, or if it actually changes your memory of the event ( after 1 week)
1 of 6
How can Loftus' study be placed in a legal context?
In 1960's people were worried about miscarriages of justice due to witness misidentification. Do people tell the truth or are memories altered by leading questions?
2 of 6
What was Loftus' definition of a leading question?
Leading questions "either by form or content, suggest to the witness what answer is desired."
3 of 6
What did Marshall's research show? (1969)
Past research with air force personnel shows estimation of speed is particularly difficult. So Loftus was aiming to test if inaccuracies would occur.
4 of 6
How can Loftus' research be placed in an academic context?
Bartlett asked pps to retell an unfamiliar story called 'war of the ghosts'. He found people tended to reconstruct the story using normalisation and rationalisation. Their memories were altered by their schemas (canoe)- like Loftus (smashed).
5 of 6
What did Carmichael's study show?
That a verbal label such as 'curtain' will shape the way a memory of a drawing is stored and therefore recalled. This fits in with Loftus' notion of reconstruction memory and was something she was aiming to test.
6 of 6

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

How can Loftus' study be placed in a legal context?

Back

In 1960's people were worried about miscarriages of justice due to witness misidentification. Do people tell the truth or are memories altered by leading questions?

Card 3

Front

What was Loftus' definition of a leading question?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What did Marshall's research show? (1969)

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

How can Loftus' research be placed in an academic context?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Psychology resources:

See all Psychology resources »See all Memory resources »