Liberal Reforms

HideShow resource information
What was the biggest political party at the start of the 20th century?
The Liberal Party
1 of 36
What were the three aspects of a welfare state?
Free health care, education and social services.
2 of 36
What are three aspects of a self-help state?
Individuals should work hard, save money carefully and it is there own fault if they are poor.
3 of 36
What two factors did the Liberals base their reforms on?
It was not always the fault of the poor that they were living in poverty and it was the role of the government to support the poor when they needed it most.
4 of 36
When did Rowntree publish his book and what was it called?
In 1901, Rowntree published a book called 'Poverty: A Study of Town Life'.
5 of 36
What conclusions did Rowntree come to?
Poverty was generally caused by old age, illness or unemployment. It wasn't usually the result of laziness or carelessness with money. The poor suffered from the ups and downs in the British trade cycle. The state should invent measures to help them.
6 of 36
Who was Rowntree's political friend?
David Lloyd George who was the leading Liberal and who became Chancellor of the Exchequer in 1908.
7 of 36
What reform did the Conservatives introduce and why?
In 1905, the Conservatives introduced the Unemployed Workmen's Act to help fight the effects of high unemployment.
8 of 36
Who were the two individuals who wanted liberal reform?
David Lloyd George and Winston Churchill.
9 of 36
When was the Boer War?
Between 1899 and 1902.
10 of 36
What did the Boer War highlight about the health of British soldiers?
50% of the recruits who volunteered to fight were found to be unfit for service due to ill health. In some poor areas of Britain, 69% were unfit and fed badly. They lacked growth.
11 of 36
Who were challenging Britain as the world's leading industrial power?
USA and Germany
12 of 36
What made German workers more efficient?
They were healthier, better educated and therefore a more efficient workforce.
13 of 36
Which countries were troubled by socialism?
France, Germany and Russia
14 of 36
Which political party did the workers support?
The Labour Party
15 of 36
What Act was passed in 1906 aimed at children and what did it entitle them to?
The Free School Meals Act was passed which allowed local authorities to provide free school meals so that children were guaranteed at least one hot meal a day.
16 of 36
How many free school meals were being served up?
14 million
17 of 36
What Act was passed in 1907 for children and what did it entitle them to?
The Free Health Care Act was passed which made every local education authority set up a school medical service.
18 of 36
How did this Act change in 1912?
The school medical service was extended from regular medical checks to providing treatment in school clinics as well.
19 of 36
What was the Children and Young Persons Act and what did it say?
In 1908, the Children and Young Persons Act was passed to give children special status as protected persons. Their parents could be prosecuted for neglect which protected children from abuse.
20 of 36
What was introduced for the old in 1908?
A government-funded old-age pension.
21 of 36
What were the negatives of the Act?
Anyone earning over £31 per year didn't qualify for a pension. Only British citizens who had been living in the UK for the last 20 years could qualify. Pensions could be refused to those who hadn't worked to their best abilities in earlier years.
22 of 36
How many people stopped claiming outdoor relief?
80 000
23 of 36
What two new principles did the Act establish?
It was non-contributory: people received the pension without having to pay towards the fund. Poverty was being tackled by direct funding from the government rather than from local rates.
24 of 36
What were Labour Exchanges and how did they work?
They allowed workers to sign onto a register when they were unemployed so that they could find out about available work.
25 of 36
When were Government Labour Exchanges set up?
1909
26 of 36
When was the National Insurance Act passed?
1911
27 of 36
Which two groups in society did it help?
The sick and the unemployed.
28 of 36
How did it help those who were ill?
Sick pay was introduced and health insurance was given to all men and women earning under £160.
29 of 36
What were the negatives for the sick?
The families of workers were not entitled to free treatment and widows were refused the pension.
30 of 36
How did it help the unemployed?
When they had work they would pay 4d out of their wages and their employer would pay 3d and the government would pay 2d into a fund. During unemployment this would be paid back to them over 15 weeks.
31 of 36
What were the negatives for the unemployed?
It was not enough money to support a working man and his family plus an amount of the benefit came out of their wages.
32 of 36
What did the Conservatives not like about the reforms?
They despised the cost and the idea of a 'nanny state' where people could not look after themselves.
33 of 36
What did some workers not like about the reforms?
The deductions from their wages.
34 of 36
How did Lloyd George counteract the rich complaint about pay for the reforms?
He said that the upper classes iherited much of their wealth and did little work to earn what they had. Therefore, they should pay for social reforms to help those who suffer from poverty.
35 of 36
What did the Labour Party not like about reforms?
They criticised the fact that workers had to fund their own benefits and felt that it should come from the taxation of the wealthy to help the poor.
36 of 36

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What were the three aspects of a welfare state?

Back

Free health care, education and social services.

Card 3

Front

What are three aspects of a self-help state?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What two factors did the Liberals base their reforms on?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

When did Rowntree publish his book and what was it called?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar History resources:

See all History resources »See all Changes in British society during the 20th century resources »