Lecture 6 Body in Pain quick fire

HideShow resource information
Flor et al. (1995)
Cortical reorganisation - sending motor signals and no movement therfore mismatch with neural representation = correlates with pain
1 of 16
Pleger et al. (2006)
Reductions in pain appear to be coincident with restoration of functional cortical representation
2 of 16
Chan et al. (2007)
lower limb amputees (mirror therapy, covered mirror, visual imagery) only mirror therapy = sig drop in pain
3 of 16
Lotze et al. (1999)
Functional myoelectric prosthesis, pain reduction = 50%, sig more than cosmetic prosthesis
4 of 16
Schmalzl et al. (2013)
Illusory touch reduce phantom pain when illusory movement does not. (Mirror/RHI/Stump mapping) 5/6 patients = sig decrease in pain synchronous touch. Diminish incongruence of v,s+t independently PL movement/motor imagery
5 of 16
Moseley (2008)
Chronic back pain - abnormal representation in brain drawings and discrimination task applies chronic pain not just PLP
6 of 16
Moseley et al. (2008)
Chronic hand pain - magnified image hand = increased pain/swelling, minimised = decreased. Simple visual illusion can alter experience pain + swelling (physical element) = abnormal representation of body.
7 of 16
Gwilym et al. (2010)
Osteoarthiritis = neural problem, extent of tissue damage does not correlate to pain experienced
8 of 16
Gilpin et al. (2015)
Mirage OA patients shrink/stretch/no illusion = OA misperceive size of hand - innacurate estimation - overestimate.
9 of 16
Preston and Newport (2011)
Mirage finger stretch - stretch/shrink painful and non painful. Striking reduction of pain in stretch + shrink, reported changes in perceived capability of movement
10 of 16
Moseley (2007)
Virtual walking in praplegic patients, virtual walking decreased pain in most patients vs film/imagery
11 of 16
Soler et al. (2010)
No sig difference control groups and virtual walking end of treatment and 2-4 week follow up on overall pain scores/continuous pain scores
12 of 16
Mohan et al. (2012)
RHI healthy brain pain modulation. No significant effect of RHI on pain ratings even when controlling for individual pain thresholds, only effect of temperature
13 of 16
Hegedus et al. (2014)
RHI pain thresholds, found effect of pain threshold and synchronous for vision of own hand and rubber hand vs asynch
14 of 16
Foell et al. (2014)
Brain changes mirror therapy PLP, 4 week training with daily mirror exercises, 2 weeks no training. Brain activation measured before/after training and structured interview about pain. Pain rating week after training sig lower than week before. IPC.
15 of 16
Pamment + Aspel (2016)
Chronic pain FBI - clinical implications, better at reducing chronic pain than acute, more sccessful than RHI may be due to disembodiment.
16 of 16

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Reductions in pain appear to be coincident with restoration of functional cortical representation

Back

Pleger et al. (2006)

Card 3

Front

lower limb amputees (mirror therapy, covered mirror, visual imagery) only mirror therapy = sig drop in pain

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Functional myoelectric prosthesis, pain reduction = 50%, sig more than cosmetic prosthesis

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Illusory touch reduce phantom pain when illusory movement does not. (Mirror/RHI/Stump mapping) 5/6 patients = sig decrease in pain synchronous touch. Diminish incongruence of v,s+t independently PL movement/motor imagery

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Psychology resources:

See all Psychology resources »See all Pain resources »