Later relationships

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  • Created by: jade
  • Created on: 18-05-15 13:30
Howes
Half of 3 and 4 year olds have at least one friend and friendship lasts at least 6 months
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Reismann and Shorr
At school entry (7yrs) children often identify four friends, and at 12 yrs identify seven friends
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Selman and Jaquette
With increasing age, the nature of friendship changes, playing together, giving help, focus on reciprocity, intimacy and sharing, interdependence and autonomy of each person
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Bigelow and La Gapia
Essay on best friends found three stages in the development of friendship - reward-cost, normative, empathic
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Waldrop and Halverson
Boys have extensive relationships and view groups as a network of friendship pairs, girls have more intensive relationships that focus on sharing of emotions and information
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Halle
Children's choices in an abstract reasoning task appear to be similar to the choices they make in real life, children, especially girls and younger children, tend to choose same-sex friends
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de Guzman et al
Brazilian 3 to 10 yr olds tend to nominate same-sex indidviduals as their best friends and give higher rating of liking to same-sex individuals
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Rose and Rudolph
boys engage in rough and tumble play, dense network of relationships defined by dominance hierarchy, verbal or physical assault, whereas girls use pro-social behaviour and problems come from social interaction issues
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Coie et al
children don't fit into popular, unpopular or rejected and should be thought about in terms of two dimensions (being liked and being disliked) which leads to neglected, popular, rejected, controversial, average
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Dodge
Rejected and neglected children do no produce socially appropriate behaviour and their beahviour explains why other children reject of neglect them
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Schaffer
Characteristics of popular, rejected, and neglected children
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Coie et al
Characteristics identified in children can affect their popularity in a group setting
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Xie et al
Deviance does not a powerful affect on popularity and age differences are identified in high-risk samples as well as low risk
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Coie and Dodge
There is a reasonably high level of continuity over a period of 5 years, in particular with rejected children
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Parker and Ascher
Children who have difficulties with peers such as rejection are at risk for later life difficulties. Caused in different ways - A causal model or an incidental model
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Kupersmidt and Coie
Rejected children are at risk for later negative outcomes. Aggression appears to have a role to play in this process
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Hymel et al
One of the reasons why rejected children drop out of school is that they associate with other who have low educational experiences and involvement with those who are at risk of leaving school early
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Laursen et al
The presence of a friend reduces the effects of being an isolated child
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Dodge et al
Complex set of interrelations can make initial difficulties even worse, never get to improve inappropriate social responses and levels of aggression are increased
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Card 2

Front

At school entry (7yrs) children often identify four friends, and at 12 yrs identify seven friends

Back

Reismann and Shorr

Card 3

Front

With increasing age, the nature of friendship changes, playing together, giving help, focus on reciprocity, intimacy and sharing, interdependence and autonomy of each person

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Essay on best friends found three stages in the development of friendship - reward-cost, normative, empathic

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Boys have extensive relationships and view groups as a network of friendship pairs, girls have more intensive relationships that focus on sharing of emotions and information

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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