Language Theorists and their Studies

Peter Trudgill in Norwich
Class and Speech with consideration of Gender- the higher up the social scale the participant was, the more standard their language was. Women from all class groups generally had a more standard form of speech than men.
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Jenny Cheshire in Reading
Adolescent Speakers, their peer groups and heir use of vernacular forms- her devised 'toughness scale' showed that the boys peer groups were more hierarchical (recorded when fighting) and girls peer groups were more fluid.
2 of 9
Mark Sebba in London
London teenagers of Jamaican descent studied in the ways they used London English, Creole and and Standard English- choice depended on audience e.g standard in school but Jamaican at home.
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William Labov's Department Store Study in New York
Relationship between class and speech- Assistants in Saks (classiest store) most likely to pronounce 'r' in 'fourth floor' and assistants in Macy's (medium store) deliberately pronounced it for prestige.
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Howard Giles' 'Capital Punishment' Study
Attitudes towards standard and non-standard English- actor read out piece in four accents, RP, Birmingham, Somerset and Wales. People asked to rate argument for capital punishment and chose RP as who had argued most highly, Birmingham was lowest.
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Paul Kerswill and Ann Williams in Milton Keynes
Children's language use at ages 4, 8 and 12- comparing children's accents to their parent's, 4 and 8 year old's was similar to parent's but 12 was not regionally specific or standard.
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Sue Fox, Paul Kerswill- MEYD
Teenage talk in London- variety of accents and dialects blurring together- e.g, 'jafaican' given by he media- urban areas with varieties of ethnic origins had young speakers of MEYD.
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Overt Prestige
Using prestige forms of language assosicates with power and status.
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Covert Prestige
'cool factor' goes against the norms of standard English and subverts it.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Adolescent Speakers, their peer groups and heir use of vernacular forms- her devised 'toughness scale' showed that the boys peer groups were more hierarchical (recorded when fighting) and girls peer groups were more fluid.

Back

Jenny Cheshire in Reading

Card 3

Front

London teenagers of Jamaican descent studied in the ways they used London English, Creole and and Standard English- choice depended on audience e.g standard in school but Jamaican at home.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Relationship between class and speech- Assistants in Saks (classiest store) most likely to pronounce 'r' in 'fourth floor' and assistants in Macy's (medium store) deliberately pronounced it for prestige.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Attitudes towards standard and non-standard English- actor read out piece in four accents, RP, Birmingham, Somerset and Wales. People asked to rate argument for capital punishment and chose RP as who had argued most highly, Birmingham was lowest.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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