Language features and their effects

Personal Pronouns
Such as "you" and "your". They make the reader more involved in the text, and make out the the writer and reader are sharing something together.
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Superlatives
These are words that make out that something is the "best" of its quality. They're used for emphasis in most cases and can be used to exaggerate. Superlatives are commonly found in persuasive texts.
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Verbs
Verbs are action words. When analysing verbs consider why the writer decided to use that one in particular, and think bout how it makes you (the reader), feel.
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Adjectives
These are describing words. They're commonly found in descriptive texts. When homing in on adjectives consider why it was used and what the writer is trying to do.
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Adverbs
These are words that describe verbs. They're used to build upon descriptions.
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Imperatives
"Don't do that", and "buy this now" are examples of imperative sentences. They put a slight pressure on the reader and may make them feel obliged to do something. They're often used in persuasive texts.
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Onomatopoeia
These are words that sound like the thing they are describing. They can help the reader to picture situations and can help the reader to understand what someone has experienced.
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Alliteration
This is when words in a sequence start with the same letter/sound. Think about what the writer is trying to highlight through the use of alliteration.
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Repetition
Can be used to put a point across effectively.
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Rule of Three
This is often found in persuasive texts and is used to emphasize something in the text.
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Emotive language
This is when the writer uses words that appeal to our emotions. In analysis, explain how it appeals to our emotions and how it makes the reader feel.
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Rhetorical Questions
When the writer asks a question for effect. They're normally used to make the reader think.
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Facts
They're used as evidence to back up points that are made in a text. These are often used in informative or argumentative texts.
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Metaphore
A direct comparison to something. Eg. He is the sun.
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Simile
Comparison using "and" or "as". E.g. She sang like an agel.
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Personification
Giving an inanimate object human qualities. E.g. The sand tickled our toes.
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Juxaposition
Two or more ideas that are placed next to each other to develop a contrast or comparison.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

These are words that make out that something is the "best" of its quality. They're used for emphasis in most cases and can be used to exaggerate. Superlatives are commonly found in persuasive texts.

Back

Superlatives

Card 3

Front

Verbs are action words. When analysing verbs consider why the writer decided to use that one in particular, and think bout how it makes you (the reader), feel.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

These are describing words. They're commonly found in descriptive texts. When homing in on adjectives consider why it was used and what the writer is trying to do.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

These are words that describe verbs. They're used to build upon descriptions.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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