Language and Technology Terminology

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  • Created by: MRH__98
  • Created on: 20-04-15 19:48
Augmentation
How technology increases/enhances communication
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Constraints
How technology limits and restricts communication between people
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Simulation
How technology reproduces the characteristics of speech and writing
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Textspeak
Language regarded as characteristics of text messages, consisting of abbreviations, acronyms, initials, emoticons, etc.
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Vowel omission
The removal of vowels from a word. Examples include 'pls' (please), 'ppl' (people) and hv (have)
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Homophonic representation
The use of single letters or numbers to represent words based on a similar sound. Examples include 2L8 (too late), M8 (mate), 2dat (today) and cos (because).
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Phonetic spelling
The representation of vocal sounds with express pronunciations of words. A system of spelling in which each letter represents invariably the same spoken sound, e.g. omigod (oh my god), iluvu (I love you) and cos (because)
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Initialism
An abbreviation consisting of initial letters pronounced separately. Examples include 'lmk' (let me know), 'dwb' (don't write back)
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Acronymy
An abbreviation from from initial letters of words pronounced as a word. Examples include 'lol' (laugh out loud) and 'sal' (such a laugh).
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Variant spelling
An alternative way of typing a phrase. Examples include 'wot' (what), 'wen' (when) and 'cuz' (because).
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Emoticon
A representation of a facial expression such as a smile or frown, formed by various combinations of keyboard characters and used in electronic communications to convey the writer's feelings or intended tone.
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Computer Mediated Communication (CMC)
Any communication controlled by computers, e.g. email, message boards/chatrooms, web pages, blogs, instant messaging etc.
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Tim Shortis' Disinhibition Theory
The theory that CMC is used to stimulate the act of conversation and to avoid exposure to negative factors which cause distress, embarrassment or cause conflict.
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Herring and Petrie (1966)
A theory that states men use bulletin boards more often to post info, while women are more likely to use them to maintain relationships. Men tend to be more adversarial & oppositional. Women more likely to develop postings from previous postings.
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Yates (1996)
Found language used within medium of computer communication closer to writing than speech. Greater use of 1st & 2nd person pronouns, possibly highlighting the impersonal nature of the text.
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Petrie (1999)
Data based on 38k emails. Women tend to use emails to talk about relationships & feelings. Males more informative & content based. Most emails use Standard English. But over 50% contain some sort of 'emailism'. Emoticons actually relatively rare.
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Asynchronous discoure
Discourse in which there are delays between turns.
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Synchronous discourse
Discourse that takes place in real time.
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Shortenings
Such as CLIPPINGS, e.g. floppy; INITIALISMS, e.g. IMHO; ABBREVIATIONS, e.g. 2nite; ELLISIONS, e.g. urite?; ACRONYMS, e.g. RAM; VOWEL DELETION, e.g. txt msg.
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Neologisms
A newly coined word or expression. Examples include 'emoticon', 'nerd' and 'leetspeek'.
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Compounds
Examples include 'e-mail', 'cyberspace', 'desktop' and 'laptop'.
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Blends
A word formed from parts of two or more other words. e.g. 'netiquette'
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Affixiation
The process of attaching an affix to form a new word. Examples include 'debug'', 'megadrive', 'minidisk', 'diskette' and 'cordless'.
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Shifts
The process of turning a noun to a verb. Examples include 'an email -> to email'; 'a fax -> to fax'.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

How technology limits and restricts communication between people

Back

Constraints

Card 3

Front

How technology reproduces the characteristics of speech and writing

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Language regarded as characteristics of text messages, consisting of abbreviations, acronyms, initials, emoticons, etc.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

The removal of vowels from a word. Examples include 'pls' (please), 'ppl' (people) and hv (have)

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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