Labelling/Interactionist (action) theories of crime and deviance.

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Do labelling/interactionist theories reject or accept offical statistics on crime?
Reject.
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Why do labelling/interactionist theories reject official statistics on crime?
See them as a social construction (underreporting etc.) so uderestimate crime.
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Labelling/interactionist theories also reject what explanation of crime and deviance?
Structural causal explanations.
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What do labelling/interactionist theories look at?
The way that crime and deviance is socially contructed.
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What methods/approaches do labelling/interactionist theories favour?
Qualitative methods/approaches.
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What are some of the qualitiative methods/approaches labelling/interactionist theories favour?
Informal Interviews, observations, personal documents.
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Becker (1983) suggests that what we count as crime and deviance is based on what?
Subjectice decisions.
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Who makes the subjective decisions?
Moral entrepreneurs.
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When does an act become deviant?
When people within a society label it as such.
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Creating deviant acts has how many outcomes?
Two.
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What is the first outcome when creating deviant acts?
A new group of outsiders will be created.
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What is the second outcome when creating deviant acts?
An agency of social control will be created or extended in order to impose labels on new offenders.
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Card 2

Front

Why do labelling/interactionist theories reject official statistics on crime?

Back

See them as a social construction (underreporting etc.) so uderestimate crime.

Card 3

Front

Labelling/interactionist theories also reject what explanation of crime and deviance?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What do labelling/interactionist theories look at?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What methods/approaches do labelling/interactionist theories favour?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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