king lear quotes 3.1-2

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  • Created by: Luna
  • Created on: 04-06-13 21:42
Act Three, Scene One. Gentleman. Animal imagery conveying storm- represents nature's ability to strip man of his luxeries and bring him to baseness
"wherin the cub-drawn bear would crouch, the lion and belly-pinches wolf..."
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Act Three, Scene One. Kent to gentlemen. Two phrases describing state of the kingdom- a result of Lear's hamartia, also a physical representation of Lear's mind
"Division/ ...this scattered kingdom..."
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Act Three, Scene Three. Lear. Personifies nature- conveys its power and dominance over him. He attempts to command it and this is futile. He is powerless and this is depicted here. Also, pathetic fallacy
"Blow, winds, and crack your cheeks! Rage! Blow!"
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Act Three, Scene Three. Repeated reference to fire within nature imagery. First real reference of 'hell' - hell becomes a state of mind rather than a physical literal place.
"Spit fire...fire are my daighters"
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Act Three, Scene Three. Lear to nature. He shows humility for the first time. Acknowledging his powerlessness. His language weakens his image- he is no longer an almighty king, but a weak man, listing adds to effect.
"Here I stand, your slave, a poor, weak and despised old man."
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Act Three, Scene Three. Lear- he seems to have learnt patience- he learns christian virtues- nature/ madness/truth enlightens him. The line echoes Cordelia in first scene. He is becoming closer to understanding her.
"No, I will be the pattern of all patience. I will say nothing,
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Act Three, Scene Three. Lear to nature. He declares his position- he is the victim of his daughters corruption. Biblical. Allows for questions to be asked about tradgedy, his hamartia, his victimisation etc
"I am a man more sinned against than sinning".
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Act Three, Scene Three. Kent. Comments on Lear's lack of headwear. Represents his lack of clothing (materialism), his lack of authority and his lack of a crown within this.
"Alck, bare-headed?"
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Act Three, Scene Three. The Fool. Prophesises; he is a timeless figure. The speech uses the hypothetical to convey a world without corruption- implies that the world of King Lear is distopian. His allusions apply to Elizebethen audience- omnipresent
"When priests are more in word than matter...when every case in law is right...and bawds and whores do churches build. This prophecy Merlin shall make; for I live before his time."
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Act Three, Scene One. Kent to gentlemen. Two phrases describing state of the kingdom- a result of Lear's hamartia, also a physical representation of Lear's mind

Back

"Division/ ...this scattered kingdom..."

Card 3

Front

Act Three, Scene Three. Lear. Personifies nature- conveys its power and dominance over him. He attempts to command it and this is futile. He is powerless and this is depicted here. Also, pathetic fallacy

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Act Three, Scene Three. Repeated reference to fire within nature imagery. First real reference of 'hell' - hell becomes a state of mind rather than a physical literal place.

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Act Three, Scene Three. Lear to nature. He shows humility for the first time. Acknowledging his powerlessness. His language weakens his image- he is no longer an almighty king, but a weak man, listing adds to effect.

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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