Karl Popper

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  • Created by: Megan
  • Created on: 26-09-14 13:59
How does POPPER differ from positivists?
He rejects their view that the distinctive featureof science lied in indictive reasoning and verificationism
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What does POPPER mean by the FALLACY OF INDUCTION?
Induction is the process of moving from the observation of particular instances of something to arrive at a general statement. The fallacy of induction is when this statement is prooved wrong
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According to POPPER, what makes science unique?
FALSIFICATIONISM. A scientific statement is one that in principle is capeable of being falsified by the evidence
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What does FALSIFIED mean?
Prooved wrong
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In POPPERs view, what are the two features of a good theory?
1)It is in principle FALSIFIABLE but when tested stands up to attempts to disprove it. 2)It is BOLD, it claims to explain a great deal and so is at greater risk of being falsified
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What are the implications of POPPERS definiton of science upon sociology?
Popper believed much of sociology is unscientific because it consists of theories that cannot be put to the test with the possiblity that they might be falsified. e.g. the Marxist prediction of a revolution
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Card 2

Front

What does POPPER mean by the FALLACY OF INDUCTION?

Back

Induction is the process of moving from the observation of particular instances of something to arrive at a general statement. The fallacy of induction is when this statement is prooved wrong

Card 3

Front

According to POPPER, what makes science unique?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What does FALSIFIED mean?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

In POPPERs view, what are the two features of a good theory?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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