Kant's Moral Argument

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What is the categorical imperative?
A moral law that applies to all rational beings and is independent of any personal desire or motive – “act only on a maxim which you can at the same time will to be a universal law” i.e. act if it is good and moral.
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According to Kant, do humans have an obligation to achieve what is best?
Yes, this is known as real virtue. We realise that this must be rewarded with true happiness.
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What is the Summum Bonum?
The ultimate end or goal which all humans should aspire to; it comprises both virtue and happiness.
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"An obligation to achieve something implies the possibility that the objective can be achieved" - what is this referring to?
That according to Kant, ought implies can. The summum bonum is possible to be achieved.
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Is it outside of humans power to ensure that virtue is rewarded with happiness?
Yes, and it necessitates the existence of God as the one who can do this?
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Can we achieve the summum bonum in our lives?
No, such happiness is not rewarded in this life so Kant argued survival after death.
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What does Sigmund Freud argue?
That socialisation forms the basis of our morality.
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What terms did Freud think in?
Relative and unnecessary guilt.
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Why did Freud think that moral awareness cannot come from God?
Because we all have different opinions about ethical issues.
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Card 2

Front

According to Kant, do humans have an obligation to achieve what is best?

Back

Yes, this is known as real virtue. We realise that this must be rewarded with true happiness.

Card 3

Front

What is the Summum Bonum?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

"An obligation to achieve something implies the possibility that the objective can be achieved" - what is this referring to?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Is it outside of humans power to ensure that virtue is rewarded with happiness?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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