Just War Theory

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  • Created by: ElizaJack
  • Created on: 23-02-16 13:19
What is war?
Armed conflict between two states.
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Why are civilians an increasing part of military campaigns?
Advancements in weapons of mass destruction.
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What is an example of a war in response to invasion?
The Faulklands, where the British regained the islands from Argentine forces.
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What is an example of a war to gain territory from a neighbouring nation?
Medieval wars waged by the British on the French.
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Give an example of a war countering a threat to peace and stability.
Israel's war in the Lebanon.
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Give an example of a war in support of a less powerful nation against a superior military force.
The Gulf War, where a coalition of military powers went to war against Iraq to reclaim Kuwait. It is arguable that the Gulf War was waged to protect Western access to oil.
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Give an example of a war where a country was obliged to support another nation due to a treaty.
The Allies in the First World War 1914.
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When were Plato's opinions on Athenian politics formed?
During the disastrous Peloponnesian War.
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When did Augustine write Civitas Dei (The City of God)?
After the Visigoths sacked Rome in 410.
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When did Hobbes write Leviathan?
After the English Civil War.
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How did he characterise life?
'nasty, brutish and short'.
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How was the intellectual map of Europe altered?
Some philosophers were enlisted to justify militaristic and nationalistic standpoints.
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What are the two levels of Jihad?
The internal, spiritual structure against evil and the external struggle against forces that represent evil. It is the duty of all Muslims.
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What are the four ways Jihad can be fulfilled?
The heart, the tongue, the hand and the sword.
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What do these refer to?
the inner, spiritual battle of the heart against vice, passion and ignorance. Spreading the word of Islam with the tongue, choosing to do good with the hand and waging war against non-muslims with the sword.
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What is war in Christianity?
Unholy, unless as a last resort and the lesser of two evils.
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How did the Archbishop of Canterbury respond to NATO's action in the Balkands in his Easter sermon?
"the civilised world cannot stand idly by and accept that evil can triumph".
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What are the jus ad bellum conditions?
Recognized authority, just cause, last resort and reasonable chance of success.
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What are the jus in bello conditions?
Proportionality (war should not constitute a greater evil than it is fighting to prevent) and non combatant immunity.
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What is an example of increasingly indiscriminate weapons?
Poison gas and air raids in WW1.
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How have modern approaches reduced 'jus ad bellum'?
Bombing civilians is unprovoked e.g in Dresden. Some argue that a nation makes it civilians vulnerable by acting aggressively, although this is still not their choice and their safety should not be compromised their governments action
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How have modern approaches reduced 'jus in bello'?
If war should not involve the innocent, where do soldier fall, including conscripts.
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Card 2

Front

Why are civilians an increasing part of military campaigns?

Back

Advancements in weapons of mass destruction.

Card 3

Front

What is an example of a war in response to invasion?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What is an example of a war to gain territory from a neighbouring nation?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Give an example of a war countering a threat to peace and stability.

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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