Jekyll & Hyde Key Quotes

Mr Hyde: "like Satan"
Simile. Stevenson has compared Hyde's behaviour to Satan's. This shocked the Victorian religious beliefs due to their understanding of Satan's behaviour.
1 of 16
Laboratory: "a certain sinister block of building thrust forward its gable on the street"
Personification. This highlights to the reader that there is something unusual about the user. Also, it makes the reader think the building is sinister.
2 of 16
Carew's Body: "The stick with which the deed had been done...had broken under the stress of this insensate cruelty; and one splintered half had rolled in the neighbouring gutter"
Imagery. This demonstrates how horrific the scene was and how brutal Hyde can be. This makes the reader really despise Hyde.
3 of 16
Carew's Body: "mangled"
Powerful verbs. This creates a horrifying image in the reader's mind as it describes a cruel, violent death.
4 of 16
The murder: "trampling", "shattered"
Onomatopoeia. It allows the reader to picture in further detail the brutality of the murder. This makes the reader feel even more disgusted at Hyde.
5 of 16
"Story of the Door"
It foreshadows the journey that Utterson is about to embark on throughout the novel.
6 of 16
"Two doors from one corner, on the left hand going east, the line was broken by the entry of a court… The door…was blistered and distained."
The use of periodic structure heightens tension as Stevenson explores Hyde's residency.
7 of 16
"I was coming home from some place at the end of the world, about three of a black winter morning. Street after street…and all as empty as a church…"
The references in this quote link to the theme of duality of man. It represents the repression that people had to experience.
8 of 16
"The man trampled calmly over the child’s body and left her screaming on the ground… It was like some damn juggernaut."
There is a juxtaposition between his actions and his reactions. He is also linked to a torture device from the early 19th Century.
9 of 16
"I never saw a circle of such hateful faces; and there was the man in the middle, with a kind of black sneering coolness…carrying it off, sir, really like Satan."
The imagery used conveys the evil in Hyde as he doesn't care about what a whole hateful crowd thinks of his actions.
10 of 16
"It was his custom of a Sunday, when his meal was over, to sit close by the fire, a volume of some dry divinity on his desk, until the clock of the neighbouring church rang our t the hour of twelve, when he would go soberly and gratefully to bed. "
As this sentence is very long, it highlights the dull and mundane lifestyle of Victorian gentlemen.
11 of 16
"Although a fog rolled over the city in the small hours, the early part of the night was cloudless, and…brilliantly lit by the full moon."
The pathetic fallacy used in this quote portray the gothic themes of the novel.
12 of 16
"Mr Hyde broke out of all bounds and clubbed him to the earth. And the next moment, with ape-like fury, he was trampling his victim underfoot and hailing down a storm of blows, under which the bones were audibly shattered…"
This imagery represents Hyde's amount of savagery and how he doesn't care about his reputation. This goes against the view of reputation of Victorian gentlemen.
13 of 16
"It was a wild, cold seasonable night of march, with a pale moon, lying on her back as though the wind had tilted her."
The use of pathetic fallacy highlights Hyde's evil and foreshadows an upcoming confrontation.
14 of 16
"…for there before my eyes – place and shaken, and half fainting, and groping before him with his hands, like a man restored from death – there stood Henry Jekyll!"
This sentence describes the moment when Lanyon watched the transformation of Hyde to Jekyll. It highlights Lanyon's shock and disbelief.
15 of 16
"My devil had long been caged, he came out roaring…"
Jekyll explains his sudden urge for release and how his id was increasing in fury.
16 of 16

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Personification. This highlights to the reader that there is something unusual about the user. Also, it makes the reader think the building is sinister.

Back

Laboratory: "a certain sinister block of building thrust forward its gable on the street"

Card 3

Front

Imagery. This demonstrates how horrific the scene was and how brutal Hyde can be. This makes the reader really despise Hyde.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Powerful verbs. This creates a horrifying image in the reader's mind as it describes a cruel, violent death.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Onomatopoeia. It allows the reader to picture in further detail the brutality of the murder. This makes the reader feel even more disgusted at Hyde.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

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