International Relations

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What was the Young Plan?
It reduced Germany's reparation payments.
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Who were the four permanent members (countries)
England, France, Italy and Japan
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What are the four commissions?
Health, Slavery, Mandates, Refugees
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3 points on the Secretariat?
Kept records of meetings and prepared reports, it was too small, it couldn't keep up with the work load
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What are the names of the big three?
Woodrow Wilson, Georges Clemenceau and David Lloyd George
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What are the countries of the big three?
USA, England, France
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What 5 territories did Germany lose because of the treaty?
Overseas empire, Forbidden to unite with Austria, Danzig (polish corridor), Empire in Africa, Alsace Lorraine
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What are the reparations?
£6.6 billion
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What were the five main terms of the treaty?
War guilt, Reparations, Armed Forces, Territory, League of Nations
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What is the anschluss?
Union of Germany and Austria
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3 points on the Assembly?
Every country sent a representative, Met once a year, Veto
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Aims of the League?
Discourage aggression, Disarmament, Encourage Trade, Improve living and working conditions.
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Who were originally excluded from joining the League?
Germany, USSR
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Who refused to join the League?
America
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Why did America refuse to join the League of Nations?
They didn't want to get involved with European affairs
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What was the Kellogg-Briand pact?
65 nations agreed not to use force to settle disputes.
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What was the Geneva protocol?
If 2 members were in dispute they would have to ask the League for help and accept the decision.
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What is hyperinflation?
When money is worth less
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What was the Dawes plan?
The USA lent Germany money to pay the reparations.
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What year was the League of Nations created?
1919
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Where was the League of Nations based in?
Geneva, Switzerland
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What did the ILO (International Labour Organisation) aim to do?
Improve working conditions
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What was clause 231?
War guilt - Germany had to take full responsibility for the war
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What were the five armed forces terms in the treaty?
Army of 100,000 men, Conscription was banned, Not allowed tanks, aircraft or submarines, Demilitarisation of the Rhineland, Navy of 15,000 men and 6 battleships
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What is the Weimar republic?
Government of Germany that was set up after WW1
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Number of Nations at the start of the League?
42
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3 points on the council?
Met often, veto, consisted of permanent members and temporary members
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What is self determination?
Countries decided whether to be independent or run by another country
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What did Georges Clemenceau want from the Treaty?
Cripple Germany so it couldn't attack them again, more land, reveng, germany to lose its colonies and navy
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What did Woodrow Wilson want from the treaty?
Germany should be punished by fairly, 14 point plan, peace, League of Nations, Self Determination
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What did David Lloyd George want from the Treaty?
Germany to be justly punished, germany to lose its colonies and navy, Britain and Germany to trade again
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How dod the economies of Britain and France affect Intrernational Relations?
They didn't want to get involved in international disputes, they did not want to risk harming their economies further
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What is the Saar plebiscite?
Saar region had been run by the League. There was a vote whether it should return to German rule. 90% voted to return.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Who were the four permanent members (countries)

Back

England, France, Italy and Japan

Card 3

Front

What are the four commissions?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

3 points on the Secretariat?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What are the names of the big three?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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