International Law

HideShow resource information
Immunity ratione personae (immunity enjoyed by virtue of the office)
Immunity from arrest and detention Immunity from criminal jurisdiction Immunity from some civil jurisdiction Immunity disappears after the office-holder leaves office
1 of 6
Immunity ratione materiae (immunity attaching to official acts)
Immunity for acts carried out by State officials Immunity is retained after the office-holder leaves office
2 of 6
Immunity ratione personae and immunity ratione materiae examples
An ambassador failing to pay the London congestion charge A diplomat participating in the kidnapping of a suspected spy
3 of 6
Abuses examples of these immunities?
Many abuses relate to vehicular offenses such as speeding and parking tickets (in 2012 London embassies had collectively amassed £58 million in unpaid congestion charges) Others are more serious (ranging from failure to pay rent to **** and murder)
4 of 6
Growing Conflict - Priority 1: Functioning of offices
Heads of government, ministers, and other State officials need immunity ratione personae because without it they cannot perform their functions
5 of 6
Growing Conflict - Priority 2: Eliminating impunity
Why should individuals engaged in grave breaches of international laws such as jus cogens escape ‘justice’?
6 of 6

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Immunity ratione materiae (immunity attaching to official acts)

Back

Immunity for acts carried out by State officials Immunity is retained after the office-holder leaves office

Card 3

Front

Immunity ratione personae and immunity ratione materiae examples

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Abuses examples of these immunities?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Growing Conflict - Priority 1: Functioning of offices

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Law resources:

See all Law resources »See all Diplomatic and Consular Immunities resources »