Impact of Parliamentary Reform, 1780-1928

What was the Dunning motion and what did it do?
This was introduced to parliament in 1780. It stated that the power of the Lords had increased, was increasing and ought to be diminished. It limited the spending power of the monarch and put an end to patronage.
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What did the Reform Act show about the Lords?
That they could be forced to back down if there was a sympathetic or neutral monarch.
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How do we know that the aristocracy remained dominant?
In the thirty years after the Reform Act, all Prime Ministers were aristocratic - except for Sir Robert Peel. In addition to this, they held almost all county seats until 1884-5.
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How did the 1832 Act reduce the power of the monarchy? What about 1880?
William IV had felt compelled to tell the Lords to drop their opposition. In 1880, Queen Victoria wanted Lord Hartington as PM but was forced to choose Gladstone.
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Why were elections subject to corruption before 1883?
There was a system of open voting until 1872 Ballot Act; people were forced to vote for their landlords or employers as they watched on; people spent absurd amounts on election campaigns if they were rich.
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What did the Corrupt and Illegal Practices Prevention Act of 1883 do?
It introduced a limit on the amount of money which could be spent on an election campaign and introduced sanctions for those who failed to do so. This made it fairer for middle-class people to be elected (not working-class as no salaries)
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The abolition of the property qualification in 1858 helped to change the Composition of the Commons. Why?
Because it allowed middle-class MPs to become elected; they no longer had to possess property.
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When did the numbers of commercial and industrial MPs outnumber that of aristocratic?
1885.
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How many working-class MPs were elected in 1885?
13.
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How many Labour MPs were elected in 1918.
57 - all of whom were working-class, and many were sponsored by the Trade Unions to help with costs.
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How did the 1832 Act impact the organisation of political parties?
It required electoral registers, so the parties had to work to ensure that their supporters were enrolled.
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How did increasing literacy rates increase organisation?
There were more newspapers around and therefore parties could have stories written about them to be read by millions - newspapers increased in circulation at this time.
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How else did the Parties become organised?
In 1832, the Tories set up the Carlton Club to enlist supporters. The Whigs opened the Reform Club in 1836. They also had a system of enrolment (John Gorst for the Tories and Joseph Chamberlain for the Liberals)
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Origins of the Labour Party?
They started as Liberal MPs voting independently on working-class issues. The ILP was set up in 1893, an LRC in 1900 and the Labour Party in 1906.
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What was Taff Vale and why is it important?
The Taff Vale railway case was significant to the Labour Party because the employees successfully sued the workers for going on strike. This showed the workers and trade unions that they needed real support.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What did the Reform Act show about the Lords?

Back

That they could be forced to back down if there was a sympathetic or neutral monarch.

Card 3

Front

How do we know that the aristocracy remained dominant?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

How did the 1832 Act reduce the power of the monarchy? What about 1880?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Why were elections subject to corruption before 1883?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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