HRM

HideShow resource information
Identify the four main HR objectives
Matching workforce to the business' needs, maintaining good employee/employer relationships, minimising labour costs, making full use of the workforce potential
1 of 45
Give three examples of internal factors that can effect HR objectives
Finance, corporate objective, organisational structure, trade unions, new technology, overall performance of the business
2 of 45
Give three examples of external factors that can effect HR objectives
Political, economic, social, technology, market changes, structure of population
3 of 45
What is hard HRM?
Where employees are seen as an asset of the business
4 of 45
What is soft HRM?
Where management focus hugely on motivating their staff to gain the full potential
5 of 45
What are the drawbacks of being hard?
Higher absenteeism, higher labour turnover, less successful recruitment, poor employee/employer relationships, demotivational
6 of 45
What are the benefits of being hard?
Increased effeciency, quicker decision making, maintaining proffessionalism
7 of 45
What are the drawbacks of being soft?
The cost of being soft, competitive disadvantage, less efficient?
8 of 45
What are the benefits of being soft?
Motivation, rewards, long term development of staff, lower labour turnover, lower absenteesism
9 of 45
What is workforce planning?
The method by which a business forecasts how many and what type of employees it needs now and future, and matches up the right types of employees to the needs of the business
10 of 45
Identify three internal influences on workforce plans
Coporate objectives, producion and marketing objectives, financial postition, strength of current labour supply, existing organisational structure
11 of 45
Identify three external influences on workforce plans
Labour market trends, legislation, economic conditions, local factors, market demand
12 of 45
What are the benefits of workforce planning?
Helps achieve corporate objectives; competitive advantage; prepares for change; changing businesses are better equiped to handle that; improved communication
13 of 45
What are the issues with workforce planning?
Cost, time, employee/employer relations, training, corporate image
14 of 45
What factors determining a business' organisational structure
Size of a business; type of the business; management and leadership style; competitive environment
15 of 45
What is a centralised structure?
A organisational structure which ensures that all important business decisions are made at the top of the hierarchy
16 of 45
What are the benefits of a centralised structure?
Easier; quicker; prevents too much independence; benefit of holistic view of company
17 of 45
What are the drawbacks associated with a cetralised structure?
More bureaucratic; junior managers are closer to customer needs; lack of authority can reduce management motivation; lack of flexibility; communication
18 of 45
What is a decentralised structure?
Decision making is spread out to include more junior managers, individuals staff and locations
19 of 45
What are the benefits of a decentralised structure?
Closer to customer needs; motivation; flexibility; improved level of customer service; consistant with aiming for flatter structure
20 of 45
What are the drawbacks of a decentralised structure?
Not necessarily strategic; longer process; more difficult; questions of who is leader; less financial control
21 of 45
What are funtional structures?
A hierarchy in which each department operates separately under the leadership of those above it
22 of 45
What are the benefits of functional structures?
Simple; strong sense of direction; clear lines of communication and command; specialist management; encourages aspirations for promotions
23 of 45
What are the drawbacks of functional structures?
Decision making becoming slow; inter-department conflicts; no overview of the whole busines
24 of 45
What is a matrix structure?
Individuals work across teams and projects as well as within their own department or function
25 of 45
What are the benefits of matrix structures?
Brakes down barriers; reduces costs; greater motivation; effective on projects
26 of 45
What are the drawbacks of matrix structures?
More pressure; no clear lines of accountability; difficult to coordinate; time
27 of 45
What is meant by delayering?
Removing one or more levels of hierarchy from the organisational structure. The layers removed are usually middle management.
28 of 45
What are the benefits of delayering?
More delegation; improve communication; reduce costs; brings managers closer to business and customers
29 of 45
What are the drawbacks of delayering?
Negative impact on motivation; period of disruption; wide spans of control; skills shortage
30 of 45
Name two types of flexible workforces.
Peripheral, outsourcing, homeworking
31 of 45
What are the benefits of having a flexible workforce?
Cost saving; better job satisfaction; motivation; take advantage of developments in technology; legislation
32 of 45
What are the drawbacks of having a flexible workforce?
Extra organisation involved; reduced employee productivity; loss of particular skills; management difficulties
33 of 45
What is communication important in maintaining an effective employee/employer relation?
Easier to implement change; motivation; objectives are conveyed and more likely to be achieved; improved competitiveness
34 of 45
What can cause barriers to effective communication?
Language; noise; overload; chinese whispers; gaps; inconsistantcies
35 of 45
What are the types of employee representation?
Trade unions and work councils
36 of 45
Why do businesses have employee representation?
Make employees' views known; present to managers the workplace issues; mutual trust develops
37 of 45
What are the benefits of employee representation?
Increased empowerment; commitment; lower risk of industrial disputes
38 of 45
What are the drawbacks of employee representation?
Time consuming; can block changes in the direction of the business; manger's authority can be undermined
39 of 45
What are the main types of industrial action?
Work-to-rule; overtime ban; go-slow; strike
40 of 45
How do industrial disputes damage the business?
Loss of sales and profit from lack out output; customer satisfaction could be damaged; internal dispution; employee/employer relationship damaged
41 of 45
How do industrial disputes damage employees?
Lost pay; potential loss of job; loss of public and customer support; legal proceedings
42 of 45
What is meant by conciliation?
When a conciliator discusses the issues with both parties in order to help them reach a better understanding of each other's postition. The conciliator encourages both parties to come to an argreement amongst themselves
43 of 45
What is meant by mediation?
When an independent impartical person helps two or more individuals or groups reach a solution that's acceptable to everyone. The aim is to restore and preserve employee/employer relatioships as much as possible
44 of 45
What is meant by arbitration?
Private alternative to a court case, where an impartial individual is asked to make a decision on a dispute. Each party presents evidence; it must be voluntary (both parties much agree to attend) and they must go by the abitrator's decision
45 of 45

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Give three examples of internal factors that can effect HR objectives

Back

Finance, corporate objective, organisational structure, trade unions, new technology, overall performance of the business

Card 3

Front

Give three examples of external factors that can effect HR objectives

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What is hard HRM?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What is soft HRM?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Business Studies resources:

See all Business Studies resources »See all Human resource strategies resources »