How plants use Glucose

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Once Glucose is made from P, glucose can be...
stored as starch
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It is transported by the phloem to ther parts of the plant as...
all plants require glucose for respiration
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The growing shoot needs glucose to...
release chemical energy to make new cells
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The Phloem transports sugars made from P from the leaves...
to the rest of the plant
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They are carried to all areas of the plant, including...
growing reigons where the sugars are needed for making plant material
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The Xylem carries water and...
mineral ions from the soil around the plant
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Glucose is soluble and if it was stored in plant cells, it could affect...
the way water moves into and out of the cells
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Starch is insoluble which means that plants can store large amounts of starch...
in their cells without it having any affect on the water balance
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Glucose is also used along with nitrates to produce...
amino acids which are needed to make proteins
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These proteins are used for structures such as...
enzymes
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Glucose and Magnesium are required to make...
chlorophyll for P
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Glucose is also important in cellulose...
production in cell walls
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Starch stores are found in all cells but especially in...
the seed
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This store of starch id broken down when...
the seed begins to germinate and is an energy store until the new plant is able to photosynthesise
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

all plants require glucose for respiration

Back

It is transported by the phloem to ther parts of the plant as...

Card 3

Front

release chemical energy to make new cells

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

to the rest of the plant

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

growing reigons where the sugars are needed for making plant material

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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