Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau

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Hobbes (1558-1679), What is his view of humans
Mechanistic
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Hobbes (1558-1679), What are his key motivations
Establish peace especially over religious conflict
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Hobbes (1558-1679) what is the power of the soverign?
Justified as the subjects must seed power in order to get back protection in return
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Hobbes (1558-1679 Free will?
Denies it because human actions are only driven by appetite
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Hobbes (1558-1679) Which type of reading does he give to the Bible?
Historcial critical view of the bible because he is skeptical about morality and God
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Hobbes (1558-1679) Drury Quote from critics of the bible
"he screened off their re;gious significance and treated them as historical documents to be chronologically ordered"
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Hobbes (1558-1679) what is the state of nature of Hobbes
State of nature tends toward war not because we are interenty eveil but because of varying judgements of danger and we may kill one another in order to protect ourselves
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Hobbes (1558-1679) Solution?
Leviathan: an establishmet of a commonwealth and confering power to a single sovereign who all will submit to
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Hobbes (1558-1679) Latin for 'war of all against all'?
Bellum ominum contra omines
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Hobbes (1558-1679) are men equal?
Yes they are equal in terms of strength ans intellect
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Hobbes (1558-1679) positives?
its a form of political authroity which allows for people of differing views and religions to coexist peacefully
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Hobbes (1558-1679) what is freedom?
The absence of hinderance
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Hobbes (1558-1679) Problems with this view?
No way of holding the leader to account as there is no recognition that coersive powers can be abused
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Hobbes (1558-1679) what does Rousseau say the problem is?
fails to see that property is the reason for war and the need to proetct our posessions is the reson for war against one another
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Hobbes (1558-1679) Job 41:33
upon earth there is no one made without fear"
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Locke 1632-1704 what do we have for one another?
We have the rights and repsonsibilites to one another independent of political power
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Locke 1632-1704 What is his definition of natural law?
constiutted by God and is knowledgebale to man by experince
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Locke 1632-1704 what does he do which is differrent to Hobbes
asserts the rights of the citizen against the sovereign
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Locke 1632-1704 instead what must people do?
Theyought to live in peace and harmony iwth one another and not harm property, liberty health and lives
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Locke 1632-1704 What is the role of the state
Join powers of the people together to influence the law
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Locke 1632-1704 what is consent?
When power is only legimate by people willingly seeding power to a soverign not by force otherwise civil society cant exist
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Locke 1632-1704 Whats the good thing about consent
it can be withdrawn and can go rwaord rebellion and revolution if natual law is not upheld
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Locke 1632-1704 which works to site 1?
Two treatise of government in the first he attacks sir albert filmer for patricha which defends the divine right of kings
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Locke 1632-1704 which works to site 2?
second is the rulers right to command is depenendt on upholding natural rights includong property and punish those who deviate from the laws
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Locke 1632-1704 what is the inital rule with natural law for locke?
initially property appropriation is limited but the inevention of money makes it unlimited
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Rousseau 1712-1778 good quote
"man is born free but everywhere he is in chains
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Rousseau 1712-1778 how are societies formed>
Formed out similarities and scarcities and cooperation, this si how jelousies come about because we see waht we dont have and want it
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Rousseau 1712-1778 who does soveriegnity belong to?
the citizens and it is necessary for freedom
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Rousseau 1712-1778 what is the state of nature?
human condition is shaped by slf preseervation concerningthe suffering of thers (amour de soi)
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Rousseau 1712-1778 Noble savage
PEople are better off in their natural states and primative people are naturally good because they are incapabale of anything else
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Rousseau 1712-1778 Private property
No need for war in an original propertyless state. source of depravity in the world and is the greatest threat to freedom - we have no natural rights to private propterty
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Rousseau 1712-1778 why is locke wrong
Property is part of the integral problem
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Rousseau 1712-1778 why is Hobes wrong?
He fails to see that property is the reson for war as we must defend our property against others
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Rousseau 1712-1778 what is the great hoax
The rich to the poor by seeding all power to a soverign but the rich have the most to loose in a war
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Rousseau 1712-1778 solution
social contract and the basis of all power must come from the people themsleves
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Rousseau 1712-1778 contin..
the state must relaise power not supress it,its a social pact of equality which recognises community interests, the state is central to relaising inequalities
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Rousseau 1712-1778 Problem 1
Motivated by his own state in geneva and the transference from a small city to a state would be problematic
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Rousseau 1712-1778 problem 2
on a national level looks very totalitarian
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Card 2

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Establish peace especially over religious conflict

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Hobbes (1558-1679), What are his key motivations

Card 3

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Justified as the subjects must seed power in order to get back protection in return

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

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Denies it because human actions are only driven by appetite

Back

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Card 5

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Historcial critical view of the bible because he is skeptical about morality and God

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