Hitler and the growth of the Nazi Party 1918-33


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  • Created by: Buffy
  • Created on: 29-04-14 21:16
Hitler and the First World War
Hitler was in the German army during the First World War. He won the Iron Cross for bravery. He worked for the army after the war.
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Hitler hated the Treaty of Versailles
He saw it as a 'stab in the back' for Germany. He believed Germany had been betrayed by Socialists and Jews.
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Hitler joined the Germans Workers' Party (DAP)
In 1919 (when it was only about 40 members) it was a right-wing group, angry about Versailles and economic problems. It was anti-communist, anti-socialist, anti-Jewish and regarded democracy as weak.
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Hitler helped the DAP grow
He and Anton Drexler (the DAP leader) drew up a 25 point programme- ti included scrapping the Versailles treaty, expanding Germany and removing citizenship from Jews. By 1920, membership was 3,000.
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The Nazi Party
In 1920 the DAP changed its name to the National Socialist German Workers' Party (NDSAP in German, Nazi for short). Hitler became the party leader (Fuhrer). In 1921 his rousing speeches began to attract even more members.
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The first Nazi newspaper
Was called Volkischer Beobatchter. Newspapers were an important way of spreading Nazi propaganda.
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The Sturmabteilung (SA)
Set up in 1921 and led by Ernst Rohm, was the Nazi private army. They wore brown uniforms and were called ‘brownshirts’. They helped the party grown by scaring rivals, protecting Nazi leader and disrupting rival meetings.
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Reasons for the Munich Putsch (1923)
Hitler wanted to exploit discontent about hyperinflation and the French occupation of the Ruhr. He wanted to act before Stresemann improved the economy and cracked down on right-wing groups.
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Events of the Munich Putsch
Hitler and 600 SA stormed a meeting of Bavarian state leaders and forced them to accept a Nazi takeover. Next day, the state leaders, no longer being physically threatened, called out the local police and army.
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Events of the Munich Putsch 2
The Nazis tried to take over the city: but state troops defeated them. Goering was wounded, 16 Nazis were killed, and Hitler was captured.
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Results of the Munich Putsch
Hitler was given 5 years in prison. But his trial gave the Nazis publicity and he used his time in prison to write Mein Kampf (My Struggle) which also gave him publicity- and he was released after only 9 months.
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Nazi Party Aims
Hitler renewed Nazism on his release in 1923. It wanted a stronger Germany (expanding its borders); state control of society and the economy (treating workers fairly); traditional German values (encouraging families); and keeping German 'blood pure'
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Nazi Party Organisation
Was improved after 1923. Hitler created gauleiters for each region, boosted party funds, employed more SA and started the SS. Goebbels improved party propaganda. The NSDAP had 100,000 members by 1929.
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The NSDAP remained weak in the Reichstag
By 1928, they had only 12 seats. This was because the Weimar government improved the economy and did well in foreign affairs. Hindenburg, a popular ex-army leader, was president
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The Great Depression (began 1929)
Changed German politics. Form 1929, the economy worsened, unemployment and unrest grew. Chancellor Bruning's government could not cope. He tries raising taxes and banning protests. Both failed. This boosted support for extreme parties.
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The Nazi gained Support
The Nazi more than other parties, because Hitler was an excellent speaker who impressed people at spectacular rallies; Nazi propaganda used simple messages like 'Work and Bread'; the SA made the Nazis seem strong and organised and broke up rival meet
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The Nazis Appealed
To workers by promising work and bread; to the middle-class as a strong, moral, party; to farmers and businesses as protection against communism. Nazi propaganda targeted groups like women and young people
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In the 1932 Presidential Election
The Nazis Appealed Hindenburg was re-elected, with 19 million votes but Hitler came second with 13 million votes. He was now a national figure.
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In May 1932
The chancellor, Brining, was sacked, his government could not deal with the problems caused by the Depression. Von Papen, the new chancellor, needed Nazi votes in the Reichstag, so he made Hitler one of his cabinet
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In July 1932
In July 1932 the Nazis became the biggest party in the Reichstag (230 seats). Hitler withdrew his support and von Papen could not continue as chancellor. Hindenburg didn't want Hitler and appointed von Schleicher as chancellor.
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By January 1933
von Schleicher could not rule without Nazi support. Hindenburg had little choice but to appoint Hitler, the leader of the biggest party in the Reichstag, as the new chancellor of Germany
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

He saw it as a 'stab in the back' for Germany. He believed Germany had been betrayed by Socialists and Jews.

Back

Hitler hated the Treaty of Versailles

Card 3

Front

In 1919 (when it was only about 40 members) it was a right-wing group, angry about Versailles and economic problems. It was anti-communist, anti-socialist, anti-Jewish and regarded democracy as weak.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

He and Anton Drexler (the DAP leader) drew up a 25 point programme- ti included scrapping the Versailles treaty, expanding Germany and removing citizenship from Jews. By 1920, membership was 3,000.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

In 1920 the DAP changed its name to the National Socialist German Workers' Party (NDSAP in German, Nazi for short). Hitler became the party leader (Fuhrer). In 1921 his rousing speeches began to attract even more members.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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