History: The Luddites

HideShow resource information
What happened in 1811?
New machines - stocking frames - were introduced into Nottingham stocking-knitting industry.
1 of 32
Why were stocking frames such a threat to skilled workers?
They could be operated by unskilled, less-paid workers.
2 of 32
What did skilled workers face? Why?
Skilled workers faced real hardship as their wages tumbled.
3 of 32
What was the skilled workers response to their tumbling wage?
They attacked the factories and smashed the stocking frames.
4 of 32
How did the skilled workers cover up their identities?
They carried out the attacks at night and used a made up name for their leader - Ned Ludd, sometimes called General Ludd, leader of the Army of Redressers'.
5 of 32
In 1812 similar protests took place where?
In West Yorkshire.
6 of 32
What happened in 1812? (Croppers)
Skilled croppers were being put out of work by new textile machines.
7 of 32
What were the new textile machines called?
Shearing frames.
8 of 32
What did skilled croppers do in West Yorkshire?
Broke into factories and smashes the new machines with sledgehammers.
9 of 32
What was one of the most serious Luddite attacks?
Took place Rawfords Mill near Brighouse in Yorkshire.Will Cartwright,the owner,was suspecting trouble&arranged for mill to be protected by armed men,who killed two Ludds.A week later the Ludds killed Will Forsfall,another large mill owner in the area
10 of 32
What was an important factor in the mass Luddite protest?
The combination of fallen wages and the rising price of bread.
11 of 32
What happened in 1812? (Riots)
Hungry people rioted the streets, demanding food.
12 of 32
What were the rumours on the nights of the riots?
Men drilling with weapons on the moors at night, preparing for an armed rebellion.
13 of 32
What did hand loomers in Lancashire do?
They attacked the cotton mills&smashed the looms which they saw to be the cause of their distress. Unable to break into Burton's Mill at Middleton near Manchester, they set fire to the owner's house. Soldiers were sent for&seven luddites were killes.
14 of 32
Why did authorities opinions and evidence juxtapose?
Authorities regarded the Luddites as a violent mobb, however evidence from Nottingham and Yorkshire suggested that they were literate and well organised.
15 of 32
What did the Luddites publish? What did these achieve?
They published pamphlets, songs and petitions, and chose their targets carefully. Threatening letters were a way of achieving their aims without further violence while those factory owners they had no quarrel with were left alone.
16 of 32
Why were authorities alarmed?
They were extremely alarmed by the threat of violence and the destruction of property - the textile machines.
17 of 32
Why were authorities terrified?
They were terrified of the spread of democratic ideas from the recent French Revolution, such as the right to every man to vote.
18 of 32
Why couldn't the police and army help authorities deal with the luddites?
There was no police force and most of the army were abroad.
19 of 32
Who were recruited to protect factories?
Special Constables were enrolled.
20 of 32
What was introduced in Nottingham to reduce damage to factories?
A curfew was imposed, anyone out of their homes after 10pm could be arrested.
21 of 32
Which government policy to reduce damage to factories didn't succeed?
The large rewards they offered for information to try and catch the ringleaders. This was evidence in itself to prove the loyalty and organisation of the protestors.
22 of 32
Who was the Prime Minister in 1812?
Spencer Perceval.
23 of 32
What did Percival introduce as Luddism spread in 1812?
The Frame Breaking Act.
24 of 32
The Frame Breaking act was passed even though...
some spoke in the debate in sympathy with the Luddites, pointing out their desperate situation.
25 of 32
What was one of the last examples of the bloody code?
Anyone caught carrying out Luddite actions could be executed.
26 of 32
Who was ordered into Northern England and the Midlands in 1812?
Twelve thousand troops - a larger number than was involved in the war at the time.
27 of 32
What were courts encouraged to do against Luddites?
Use the maximum sentences.
28 of 32
What happened at the York Assizes in 1813?
Three men were executed for the murder of William Horsfall. Another fourteen were hanged, and eight transported for the attack on Rawfolds Mill.
29 of 32
What were the punishments in Lancashire?
Four people were hanged for setting a mill on fire; one was twelve years old. A further eight men were hanged and thirteen transported for Luddite actions on cotton mills.
30 of 32
What were the punishments in Nottingham?
The judges weren't as savage as Lancashire and York Assizes: no one was execute but several were sentenced to transportation.
31 of 32
When was there occasional further outbreaks of machine smashing?
In 1816 and 1817 - but this show of force, and gradually improving conditions, effectively subdued the Luddite protest; the machines were here to stay.
32 of 32

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Why were stocking frames such a threat to skilled workers?

Back

They could be operated by unskilled, less-paid workers.

Card 3

Front

What did skilled workers face? Why?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What was the skilled workers response to their tumbling wage?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

How did the skilled workers cover up their identities?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

louise0552

This resource is great do you have any for the other protests? 

Similar History resources:

See all History resources »See all Protest and Reaction in Britain 1800-1914 resources »