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1529
Sir Thomas Moore replaced Wolsey as Lord Chancellor.
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1529
Wolsey held his title as Lord Chancellor for 14 years before he was dismissed by Henry for failing to obtain the popes consent to his divorce from Catherine of Aragon.
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1529
Henry was still commited to gaining a divorce. In the same year that he replaced Wolsey with Moore he also summoned the reformation parliament hoping to gain ideas and support that would allow him to get a divorce by cutting his ties with Rome.
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1530
In his search for a solution to his need for a divorce, the following year after the calling of the Reformation Parliament, Henry welcomed Thomas Cromwell into his council.
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1530
Along with the introductionof Cromwell, Henry also recieves a copy of the collectanea satis copiosa from Thomas Cranmer and Edward Fox. This book supported the idea of the king as head of the church thus allowing him to grant his own divorce.
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1532
Unable to agree with the break with Rome, Thomas Moore a devote Catholic, resigns as Lord Chancellor - a position he had held for only 3 years.
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1533
In 1533 Thomas Cranmer, supporter of the protestant ideas and of the king as head of the church, was made Archbishop of Canterbury.
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1533
Henry announces his official split from Catherine of Aragon. With the support and new placement of Cranmer as Archbishop, Henry is able to marry Anne Boleyn.
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1533
Henry is excommunicated (not part of the Catholic church) as soon as he marrieds Anne.
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1534
A year after his marriage to Anne and with the help of Thomas Cromwell, the act of supremacyis passed and Henry is declared the head of the English church.
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1534
Earlier in the same year that the act of supremacy was passed, parliament passed more actstaht would distance England from Catholic Rome, such as - Acts for the submission of the clergy in absolute restraint of annates and the succession act.
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1535
All people in England were required to take the oath of supremacy recognising Henry as head of the church NOT the pope. However some refused, such as Moore who, only 3 years after his resignation, was put to death for this traitorous refusal.
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1536
3 years after their marriage Henry ordres the execution of Anne and marries Jane Seymour - a Catholic - but reformation continues.
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1536
In 1536 Cromwell starts the dissolution of the monasteries, it takes 3 years to complete and is a key part of the reformation.
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1537
After only a year together Jane Seymour dies after the birth of their son Edward, the future Edward VI.
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1538
The first official English bible was published in 1538
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1540
The beginning of the 1540's was busy for Henry. He marries and divorces Anne of Cleaves, married Catherine Howard and has Cromwell executed on a charge of treason.
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1542
Catherine Howard was executed in 1542 following infidelity accusations.
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1547
Henry dies in 1547 leaving Edward VI to carry out the final stages of the protestant reformation.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Wolsey held his title as Lord Chancellor for 14 years before he was dismissed by Henry for failing to obtain the popes consent to his divorce from Catherine of Aragon.

Back

1529

Card 3

Front

Henry was still commited to gaining a divorce. In the same year that he replaced Wolsey with Moore he also summoned the reformation parliament hoping to gain ideas and support that would allow him to get a divorce by cutting his ties with Rome.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

In his search for a solution to his need for a divorce, the following year after the calling of the Reformation Parliament, Henry welcomed Thomas Cromwell into his council.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Along with the introductionof Cromwell, Henry also recieves a copy of the collectanea satis copiosa from Thomas Cranmer and Edward Fox. This book supported the idea of the king as head of the church thus allowing him to grant his own divorce.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

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