history Paper 2

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: elliesp
  • Created on: 13-06-16 14:18
name the old ideas about poverty?
it was your own fault and you should help yourself, you spent your money on drinking or gambling, you didn't save, you were lazy and couldn't be bothered to find work.
1 of 22
in what decade did Rowntree and Booth research poverty?
1890s.
2 of 22
why did Booth research poverty in London? what did he discover?
He researched poverty in London because he didn't believe the official statistics that stated 25% of the working population lived in poverty, however after years of investigating poverty in London he discovered about 30% of londoners lived in poverty
3 of 22
what conclusion did Booth make about his findings?
Booth concluded that people were in poverty because of circumstances beyond their control such as disease, large families, old age, unemployment
4 of 22
How did Booth come to the conclusion that 30% were affected by poverty?
He came up with a method called the 'poverty line' which meant that if you didn't have enough money to buy enough food, shelter and clothing then you were below the poverty line and you were in poverty.
5 of 22
What did Seebohm Rowntree discover about the poverty state of York? what did this prove?
Rowntree discovered that about 30% of the york population were in poverty; this proved that poverty was a widespread problem throughout britain, not just London, as Booth showed.
6 of 22
when was the labour party formed? how?
1900, all the socialist groups came together and formed the labour party which pledged to get better living and working conditions for working people as well as a fairer distribution for the country's wealth.
7 of 22
When did the liberal party come into power?
1906
8 of 22
How did the rising concern about poverty affect the liberal party?
they realised they needed to support the poor, or they'd lose working class votes as they'd vote for labour. Churchill & Lloyd George challenged traditional liberal values & thought gov. should give people opportunity to live in security &freedom
9 of 22
Why did Britain's economic problems add to concerns about poverty?
Up until the end of the 19th century, Britain was leading industrial nation & then others started to take over. If nothing was done to improve poverty & unemployment, we'd lose our economic competiveness.
10 of 22
how did the Boer war raise concern about poverty? when was it?
The Boer war of 1899 raised concern as one in every 3 volunteers for the army was turned down because they weren't in good enough condition. This brought attention to the need to improve poverty as it was affecting the health of Britain massively.
11 of 22
what were the liberal reforms for children? state the year for each one.
free school meals (1906), school medical inspections (1907), children's charter act (1908), school clinics (1912)
12 of 22
what was the children's charter act (1908)?
children became protected persons so their parents could be prosecuted for cruelty against them. Children under 14 couldn't go to adult prisons, they were sent to borstals. Children under 14 not allowed to buy cigarettes or alcohol.
13 of 22
what were the liberal reforms for the sick and unemployed? state the year for each one.
Labour exchanges act (1909), National Insurance Act (1911), National Insurance Act Part 2 (1912)
14 of 22
What was the labour exchanges act (1909)?
unemployed workers could go to labour exchanges to look for a job instead of having to travel from place to place to find work.
15 of 22
What was the national insurance act (1911)?
Purpose was to reduce poverty caused by illness. Employers paid 3d & Gov paid 2d per worker into a scheme that ensured if a worker became ill they could claim 10s a week for 13 weeks & 5s for 13 weeks after that. They also got free medical care.
16 of 22
What was the national insurance act part 2 (1912)?
aimed to prevent poverty resulting from periods of unemployment. People who were only seasonally employed could claim 7s 6d a week for up to 15 weeks.
17 of 22
what were the liberal reforms for the elderly? what year was it introduced and what did it mean?
Pensions Act (1908) - everyone over the age of 70 was eligible for a pension, 5s a week if you were single, and 7s 6d a week for a couple (later increased to 10s)
18 of 22
what were the limitations of the reforms for the elderly?
the money wasn't even enough to allow people to pay for the bare necessities, also, many people died before they reached 70.
19 of 22
what were the limitations of the reforms for the sick and unemployed?
the national insurance act only provided for the worker and not their family, also the amount given to them was barely anything.
20 of 22
what were the limitations of the reforms for children?
only half of british schools set up meal services and children still continued to drink and smoke illegally.
21 of 22
why was there opposition to the reforms?
the reforms had to be paid for & so lloyd george introduced a budget in 1909 which taxed the rich &landowners. At first the house of lords opposed it, but had to accept it after 1910 when the liberals won a general election.
22 of 22

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

in what decade did Rowntree and Booth research poverty?

Back

1890s.

Card 3

Front

why did Booth research poverty in London? what did he discover?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

what conclusion did Booth make about his findings?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

How did Booth come to the conclusion that 30% were affected by poverty?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar History resources:

See all History resources »See all paper 2 resources »