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When war was declared in August 1914, there were street celebrations throughout the length and breadth of Great Britain. Such scenes were repeated throughout Europe.
Many believed that the war would be over by Christmas 1914 and many young men rushed to answer the call to arms – as did many men who were too old to serve but wanted to show their patriotism.
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The government asked for 100,000 volunteers but got 750,000 in just one month. The public was quickly deluged with numerous propaganda posters to encourage everyone in their nation’s time of need.
The war led to inflation and many poorer families could not afford the increase in food prices. The impact of the German U-boat campaign also led to food shortages and this hit home when rationing was brought in by the government in February 1918.
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As nearly everything was directed towards the war effort, fuel was also in short supply and this was also rationed.
The demand for war munitions meant that factories worked all but round the clock to ensure that soldiers were well supplied with ammunition. This invariably led to accidents as safety was sometimes seen as secondary to producing munitions.
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Before the war, a woman’s role was in the home. But with the men away at war, help was needed in the workplace - and so millions of women went to work in offices, factories, shops, transport and on farms.
Many men were horrified by the idea of females working and, even worse, wearing trousers! But the women proved that they could do the work of men, and do it just as well. Without the women of Britain growing food and making weapons, the war could not
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have been won. Girl Guides would make basic medical equipment for wounded soldiers, like bandages, swabs and slings. They also worked growing vegetables and delivering milk. Boy Scouts collected eggs for injured troops, protected roads and railway li
and delivered messages. Children were even paid to collect conkers which could be turned into explosives! They also wrote letters to soldiers and helped to knit socks and scarves for the troops in the winter months. Some boys lied about their age and
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

The war led to inflation and many poorer families could not afford the increase in food prices. The impact of the German U-boat campaign also led to food shortages and this hit home when rationing was brought in by the government in February 1918.

Back

The government asked for 100,000 volunteers but got 750,000 in just one month. The public was quickly deluged with numerous propaganda posters to encourage everyone in their nation’s time of need.

Card 3

Front

The demand for war munitions meant that factories worked all but round the clock to ensure that soldiers were well supplied with ammunition. This invariably led to accidents as safety was sometimes seen as secondary to producing munitions.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Many men were horrified by the idea of females working and, even worse, wearing trousers! But the women proved that they could do the work of men, and do it just as well. Without the women of Britain growing food and making weapons, the war could not

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

and delivered messages. Children were even paid to collect conkers which could be turned into explosives! They also wrote letters to soldiers and helped to knit socks and scarves for the troops in the winter months. Some boys lied about their age and

Back

Preview of the back of card 5

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