Heath and social care unit 2 part 2

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How are people with a physical disability supported in their home?
By ensuring that the person has access to all rooms at home, e.g. no stairs or a stair lift. By ensuring that facilities are within reach and not at floor level, e.g. electrical sockets and if necessary, hoists are available in bedrooms and bathrooms
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How are people with a physical disability supported in their educational setting?
By ensuring that service users can access classroom and laboratories. By ensuring that disabled children have access to play and exercise facilities and that the curriculum is adapted to meet their needs, e.g language used in lessons.
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How are people with a physical disability supported in their work?
By ensuring that awareness training for work colleagues. By ensuring that a support worker to help the person in the workplace and that extra time is given, if necessary, to complete work tasks.
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How are people with a physical disability supported in their leisure setting?
By providing accessible changing facilities. By providing suitable signage, e.g. in braille for people with visual Impairment. By providing access to adapted seating and spaces for elevated wheelchair viewing.
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What is direct discrimination?
Direct discrimination is where someone is being treated worse, different, or less favourable because of their characteristics.
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What is indirect discrimination?
Indirect discrimination is when and organisation's practices, policies or rules have a worse effect on some people than others.
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What is the Equality Act 2010?
The Equality Act protects people against age, disability, gender reassignment, pregnancy and maternity, race - this includes ethnic or national origins, colour or nationality, religion or belief - this includes lack of belief, sex, sexual orientation
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Define Empowerment
Empowerment means giving individuals information and support so they can take informed decisions and make choices about their lives in ordr to live as independent as possible.
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What are the possible risks when we are not ensuring safety in care?
•Abuse by other service users and or staff •Inadequate supervision of facilities, such as bathrooms •Inadequate supervision of support staff, for example when moving patients •Lack of illness prevention measures
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What are the possible risks when we are not ensuring safety in care?
•Infection due to lack of clean facilities and equipment •Inadequate control of harmful substances. •Lack of properly maintained first-aid facilities.
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How do we manage risks when ensuring safety in care?
•Using risk assessments to identify possible sources of harm, assess the likelihood of them harm and to minimise the chance of harm •Staff training to manage risks •Clear codes of practice which are familiar to all staff, including safeguarding
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How do we manage risks when ensuring safety in care?
•Appropriately qualified staff •Ensuring all staff have Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) clearance • Regular and evidenced checks of facilities and provision of safe drinking water
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How do we manage risks when ensuring safety in care?
•Availability of protective equipment and knowledge of infection control procedures •Procedures for reporting and recording accidents, incidents and complaints •Provision of maintained first-aid facilities
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What are the stages of reporting incidents and accidents?
1.Detect incident or accident 2.Record incident or accident 3.Report incident or accident to relevant person 4. Classily incident or accident according to the type and severity 5.Prioritise issues for appropriate actions 6.Propose preventative measur
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What are barriers to incident reporting?
•The incident or accident is seen as not important at the time. • The incident form is too long or require too much detail. •Care staff have other, more pressing, duties. •Staff may not know about reporting •It may be difficult to access the per
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What are four key points about complaints procedures?
1. At care settings must have them in place 2. All care settings must enable service users to access and use them 3. They are checked when care providers are inspected 4. They can lead to service improvements
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

How are people with a physical disability supported in their educational setting?

Back

By ensuring that service users can access classroom and laboratories. By ensuring that disabled children have access to play and exercise facilities and that the curriculum is adapted to meet their needs, e.g language used in lessons.

Card 3

Front

How are people with a physical disability supported in their work?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

How are people with a physical disability supported in their leisure setting?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What is direct discrimination?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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