Great Expectations key quotes

  • Created by: Will Lang
  • Created on: 27-09-17 16:50
"Pitying his desolation, and watching him as he gradually settled down upon the pie, I made bold to say, "I am gald you enjoy it."" (page 17)
This shows that Pip is kind towards Magwitch even though he is scared of him. This leads Magwitch to remember Pip forever
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"I have a sick fancy that I want to see some play." (page 56)
Miss Havisham is using Estella to get revenge on all men because of her experience. Estella humiliates Pip through things she says.
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"What could I do but follow him? I have often asked myself the same question since: but what else could I do?" (page 87)
The narrator Pip shows Pip's weakness at Satis house when he fights Herbert Pocket. This shows that Estella would favour Herbert over Pip.
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"Gargery is your master now." (page 98)
Miss Havisham cruelly tells Pip to leave Satis House and that he is no longer needed to return. This makes him upset.
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"as if she was morally wrenching one of my teeth out at every reference." (page 93)
Pip shows using this disturbing metaphor the nature of Mrs Joe's attitude towards him.
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"feast upon me." (page 85)
Miss Havisham uses an image of cannibalism (theme throughout) as a metaphor to show that when she is dead, the Pockets will inherit all her money.
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"I thought I heard the file still going; but it was only a sheep bell." (page 32)
Dickens uses humour to show th strange way that Pip jumps at every small sound. This shows that he is a scared, weak character because of his sister.
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"dark flat wilderness." (page 1)
This shows that the marshes in Kent are eery and lonely. This reflects in Pip as he is an orphan and has few friends.
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"if you was my wife, I'd hold you under the pump, and choke it out of you." (page 111)
This shows Orlick criticising Mrs Joe's bad temper and shows Orlick's lack of intelligence in how he speaks.
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"if any man in that neighbourhood could stand up long against Joe, I never saw the man." (page 111)
This shows Pip explaining Joe's size and strength because of him being a blacksmith.
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" as if I had some thoughts of following it." (page 125)
This shows Pip throwing grass into the river when he realises he was a "lunatic" for believing Estella would love him. It conveys Pip's strong love for Estella.
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"a gentleman should not be unjust." (page 146)
Biddy tells Pip that he needs to stay the way he is even though he is a gentleman. He ignores this and judges her and Joe by their wealth. It shows that Biddy is more intelligent.
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"no man who was not a true gentleman at heart, ever was, since the world began, a true gentleman in manner." (page 175)
Herbert tells Pip that to be a gentlemen is more than wearing smart clothes, it is behaving in a good manner. Pip learns that poor people are gentlemen because of how they act like Joe.
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"like a bird's-nest." (page 214)
This shows Pip's poor treatment of Joe as he progressively becomes more of a stereotypical gentleman.
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"ever right", "werry" and "calc'lated" (pages 214 and 2150
This shows Joe's lack of intelligence in his manner of speaking. This links to when Estella mocks Pip for the way he talks.
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"Sir" (page 215)
Joe is clumsy and appears to treat Pip differently which upsets him.
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"Don't know yah, don't know yah, pon my soul don't know yah!"
Repetition makes it seem like Trabb's boy is mocking Pip for being a snob. It also shows how far away Pip is getting from his background.
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"a carpenter who had once eaten two geese for a wager." (page 273)
The leader of the funeral is described with satire to show that his serious role is only used in the job and he is a different person in his free time.
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"that inexplicable feeling I had had before." (page 263)
Pip's sensitivity to the impacts people have on him in shown and he does not fully understand it. A gas lamp flashes symbolising it will become clear.
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"the footstep of my dead sister." (page 307)
This gothic image shows that Magwitch's reappearence is like seeing a ghost that he hoped he would never meet again.
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"from darkness beneath." (page 308)
Magwitch's voice is referred to as being from hell as he has done terrible things in his life.
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"Who taught me to be hard?" (page 299)
Estella is shown to be emotionally damaged by her upbringing and she regrets how she is.
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"I was a ragged little creetur" and "Compeyson was set up fur a gentleman." (page 338)
This shows that Pip and Magwitch are both drawn to people of higher status even though they are lower class.
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"Molly, Molly, Molly, Molly, how slow you are to-day!" (page 381)
This shows Jaggers' control over Molly and reflects social status. Repetition shows that he emphasizing his point.
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"I little supposed my heart could ever be as heavy and anxious at parting from him as it was now." (page 370)
This shows that Pip feels sorry for the way he treated people and it reflects his kindness for them in earlier chapters.
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"winding sheets" and "remind of hanged clients." (page 380)
This symbol shows Jaggers' dark side of the his role in the justice system such as hanging and fear.
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"disturbed beetles and spiders." (page 393)
This gothic scene shows a fitting ending to Miss Havisham's life as she will be eaten by the creatures and it punishes her for how she treated Pip.
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"is a lady and very beautiful. And I love her!" (page 451)
This comforts Magwitch knowing that he will die with his daughter being with a respectable man.
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"I saw no shadow of another parting from her." (page 475)
Last line is ambigious as it means he could not see that Estella did not love him or that she will never leave him again."
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"convict on the marshes" (page 316)
Pip is horrified that his money has come from a criminal. He learns to accept Magwitch's kindness and shows compassion to him.
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"Ever the best of friends; ain't us Pip?" (page 459)
This shows that Joe loves Pip more than anyway despite the fact that Pip is ashamed of Joe's behaviour.
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"the bride within the bridal dress had withered like the dress" (page 55)
Pip shows that Miss Havisham was mentally unstable when he met her.
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"But as she grew, and promised to be very beautiful, I gradually did worse" (page 391)
This shows that Miss Havisham regrets how she brought Estella up and apologises to Pip.
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"as a form of words" (page 353)
Estella understands Pip's love for her as just words and does not return it. This highlights her cold nature.
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"i shuddered at the thought that.....his hand might be stained with blood." (page 315)
Pip judges Magwitch by his past despite how the things he has done for him.
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"Oh, Jaggerth, Jaggerth, Jaggerth!"
Jaggers' clients are anxious to meet him as he strikes fear into people.
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"had a strong conviction on me that I should never like Joe's trade" (page 103)
Theme of self knowledge. Pip's opinions of life had changed at Satis House and he no longer wants to be a blacksmith.
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"father denied her nothing"
Theme of wealth. Miss Havisham was denied nothing by her father and knows nothing of a life outside of being rich.
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"I don't expect it do me any good...I took him. He knows it. That's enough for me" (page 34)
Theme of revenge. Magwitch is determined to get revenge on Compeyson and values him being locked up more than his own personal freedom.
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"saw the auctioneer's clerk walking on the casks and telling them off for the information of a catalogue compiler, pen in hand" (page 465)
Context of Industrial Revolution. The fall of Satis House reflects the changing landscapes of Britain in the 19th century.
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"all asmear with filth and fat and blood" (page 160)
Setting of London. Setting is very different to Kent and repetition emphasizes the state of London.
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"accusatory manner" (page 14)
The cows watch Pip when he steals the food for Magwitch. This is a sense of pathetic fallacy.
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"I must give one chapter to Estella" (page 293)
Pip is speaking in first person as the narrator and is speaking to us as he writes the book. This puts us in Pip's mind so we can see his thoughts.
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"I was lost in the mazes of my future fortunes" (page 138)
Pip admits his own weaknesses to us as though we were his friends. It shows that he knows where he went wrong in life.
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"where the wind from the river had room to turn itself around" (page 365)
The wind is described using a personification as imagery. It provides a poetic effect and shows the beauty of the scene.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Miss Havisham is using Estella to get revenge on all men because of her experience. Estella humiliates Pip through things she says.

Back

"I have a sick fancy that I want to see some play." (page 56)

Card 3

Front

The narrator Pip shows Pip's weakness at Satis house when he fights Herbert Pocket. This shows that Estella would favour Herbert over Pip.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Miss Havisham cruelly tells Pip to leave Satis House and that he is no longer needed to return. This makes him upset.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Pip shows using this disturbing metaphor the nature of Mrs Joe's attitude towards him.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

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16laggett

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this is so helpful, thank you

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