GOVP2 - PARLIAMENT

  • Created by: JL000
  • Created on: 05-05-18 14:07
What is a parliamentary system?
System of government where the executive and legislative branches are fused, elections decide the government who share collective responsibility and there is a separate head of state
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What is Bicameralism?
Political system in which there are two chambers in the legislature
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Outline the five main functions of parliament
Legislation, Scrutiny, Representation, Recruitment and Legitmacy
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What is the process of passing legislation?
First reading - Second reading - Committee stage - Report stage - Third reading- House of Lords stage
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How is parliament's effectiveness limited?
Government holds majority, parliamentary timetable, party discipline and the inability of the House of Lords
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Three main ways that parliament ensures government accountability
PMQs, the Opposition, and Select Committees
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Five reasons why the Executive are able to dominate parliament
Party loyalty, power of patronage, executive control of Commons timetable, large majority in the Commons and relative weakness of the Lords
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Three ways in which the power to appoint peers to the Lords can be used
Bring people into the cabinet without a by-election (Gus Macdonald Labour 1998), getting rid of potentially troublesome backbenchers (elevation of Thatcher), and reward for political service (Phillip Gould Labour 2004)
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What did the 1911 Parliament Act do?
Replaced Lords' right to veto with the power to delay bills for two years. Lords were also not allowed to have a say on money bills
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What did the 1949 Parliament Act do?
Reduced power of Lords to delay a parliamentary session
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What is the Salisbury doctrine?
Established convention that Lords cannot veto a bill at second reading if the bill had been a clear measure in the government's manifesto
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Three instances that have showed the Lords remain effective
2005 amendments on control orders for terrorists, 2007 amendments on proposals to restrict trial by jury, and 2018 amendments on EU withdrawal bill
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What did the House of Lords Act do and what year was it?
1999 - Reduced number of hereditary peers to 92
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Why has reform to the Lords been difficult?
No real consensus about the best way forward and there is also a general sense that the Lords performs its functions well
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What is a parliamentary rebellion?
A division in which MPs vote against their party whip
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Example of rebellion in Heath government
Rebellion by 39 Conservatives over the European Communities Act 1974
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Example of rebellion under Blair
Rebellion by 139 MPs on the 2003 invasion of Iraq
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Four reasons why the relationship between backbenchers and party leaders suffered under the coalition
Departmental select committees' membership no longer controlled b y party whips, power of backbench business committee, professionalism and digital democracy has given greater authority to individual MPs
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Example of backbench success
Government abandoned plan to privatise forests in 2010
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Example of rebellion under Cameron
134 Tory rebels against gay marriage legislation in May 2015
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What is Bicameralism?

Back

Political system in which there are two chambers in the legislature

Card 3

Front

Outline the five main functions of parliament

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What is the process of passing legislation?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

How is parliament's effectiveness limited?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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