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Locations of rock landscapes (4)
Dartmoor,Yorkshire Dales, South Downs, Cairngorms
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Name 3 details about GRANITE landscapes
1. Does not erode. Forms features like Tors and Rocky outcrops 2. Impermeable - doesn't let water soak through. This results in lakes and rivers and lots of marshy areas. 3. Weathers to produce poor acidic so
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Name 4 details about LIMESTONE landscapes
1. The landscape produced by limestone is called KARST scenery. 2. Limestone produces flat topped moorlands with steep edges cut into by gorges (steep sided valleys) 3. Water cant soak into limestone but it
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Name 4 details about CHALK landscapes
1. Chalk forms escarpments - with scarp (steep) slopes and dip (gentle) slopes. 2. Chalk is porous (full of tiny holes) so rainwater soaks into it, leaving few surface streams. 3. Streams soak into the top of chalk escarpment and reappear at the bo
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The Rock Cycle
This is a set of events that repeats again and again. Constructive forces form new igneous rock, destructive forces break down rock and form sedimentary rocks, and other forces push rock deep beneath the surface, where heat and pressure form metamorp
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The Tees-Exe Line
An imaginary line that can be drawn on a map of Great Britain which roughly divides the lowland and upland regions of the country. The lowlands (sedimentary rocks) are predominant to the east of the line and higher land (igneous and metamorphic rocks
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Weathering
The breaking down of rocks and other materials on the Earth's surface.
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Physical Weathering
Any process that breaks rock down into smaller pieces without changing the chemistry of the rock; typically wind, water and freeze-thaw weathering
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Chemical Weathering
Process in which the chemical composition of rocks is changed by agents such as natural acids and oxygen
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Biological Weathering
Any weathering that's caused by the activities of living organisms.
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Freeze-Thaw Weathering
When water seeps into the pores of the rocks and freezes, thus expanding and breaking down the rock.
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Limestone Landforms
Limestone is partially soluble, especially in acid, and therefore forms many erosional landforms. These include limestone pavements, pot holes, cenotes, caves and gorges. Such erosion landscapes are known as karsts.
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Granite Landforms
Tors and Moorland are typical landforms.
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Chalk and Clay Landforms
1. Dry Valley - formed by a river during Ice Age or period of high water table. Since then, water found easier route. 2. Spring Line - line at which the ground levels with the water table and springs (re-emergent water) occur. 3. Escarpment/Cuesta i
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Igneous Rock
A rock formed by the crystallization of molten magma.
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Sedimentary Rock
Any rock formed by the deposition of sediment or sediment derived from pre-existing rock.
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Metamorphic Rock
Igneous or sedimentary rock that has been changed into a new kind of rock as a result of great pressure and temperature
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Aquifers
Subterranean, porous, water-holding rocks that can hold vast amounts of water.
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Card 2

Front

Name 3 details about GRANITE landscapes

Back

1. Does not erode. Forms features like Tors and Rocky outcrops 2. Impermeable - doesn't let water soak through. This results in lakes and rivers and lots of marshy areas. 3. Weathers to produce poor acidic so

Card 3

Front

Name 4 details about LIMESTONE landscapes

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

Name 4 details about CHALK landscapes

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

The Rock Cycle

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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