Geography Revision

This is a Geography revision set about the restless earth and criminal geography. This is not all you need to know, just the basics, so get revising and then go and research more! Good luck!

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  • Created by: Dragon02
  • Created on: 24-05-16 19:16
volcanologist
a scientist who studies volcanoes
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seismograph
a machine for measuring the power of earthquakes
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plate tectonics
the theory that the earth's crust is fractured and moves
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constructive plate boundary
two plates move apart allowing magma out
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destructive plate boundary
two plates colliding causing subduction
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mantle
the largest part of the earth's structure, below the crust
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core
the central part of the earth's structure
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crust
the thin layer of rock which carries the world's continents and oceans
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volcano
a weakness in the earth's crust that allows magma to escape
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earthquakes
a violent shaking of the earth caused by plates colliding
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Where and what is the crust?
The surface of the earth. Solid rock, from 8km to 65km.
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What state is the mantle?
Solid near the crust, liquid near the core.
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What state is the outer core?
Liquid, molten iron.
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What state is the inner core?
Solid, iron.
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What are convection currents?
Heat from the core rises up through the mantle and hits the underside of the crust. They are pushed sideways and drag the plates with them. They move a few cms each year.
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What are some effects of earthquakes? PART 1
1. large tidal wave: tsunami 2. landslides 3. huges cracks in the earth: fissures 4. buildings collapse and make rescue difficult.
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What are some effects of earthquakes? PART 2
5. gas and electricity are cut off, causing fire and danger 6.transport comes to a standstill 7. water pipes burst, making fighting fire difficult.
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What are some responses to earthquakes? SHORT TERM
1. Doctors, firefighters, the army, etc have to rescue people. 2. Tents, food, water and clothing are given to those who have lost everything.
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What are some responses to earthquakes? LONG TERM
1. People donate to help re-build the affected countries. 2. Plans are made to protect against and try to predict earthquakes in the future.
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Tell me about the 1980 Mt St Helen's eruption.
March 20 1980: magnitude 4.2 earthquake and steam venting. In April: a bulge (aka:cryptodome), dbris avalanche.
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defensible space
a space that people can watch over and protect from crime
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mental map
a map that you carry in your head (it may not be very accurate)
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CCTV
Closed Circuit Television, used in shops and streets to fight crime
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the Burgess model
a pattern that cities make as they grow out over time
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neighbourhood watch
a scheme where neighbours help to prevent crime
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CBD
Central Business District, the city centre with shops and entertainment
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Inner City
the are surrounding the city centre with terraced housing and industry
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Outer Suburbs
an area characterised by large, detached housing and open spaces
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designing out crime
designing new developments to make them crime-proof
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offender
a person who commits crime
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How is the Burgess model set out?
From the centre outwards: CBD, Inner City, Inner Suburbs, Outer Suburbs, Rural-Urban Fringe
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What sort of housing would you find in the CBD?
Apartments and flats: 1-2 bed,expensive, little parking, high-quality. Aimed at single people, not children, as there is no garden space.
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What sort of housing would you find in the Inner City?
Terraced: Victorian, long rows, no gardens, small yards, street parking, narrow, back-to-back.
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What sort of housing would you find in the Inner Suburbs?
Semi-detached: built for retrning soldiers from WWI, 3-4 bed, driveways (as cars were affordable), two gardens, enjoyable.
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What sort of housing would you find in the Outer Suburbs?
Detached: larger, 4-5 bed, garages, two gardens, multiple toilets, modern, conservatories.
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What are three methods of crime prevention?
Target hardening, designing out crime, defensible space.
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What is target hardening?
Making a target harder to get at, more visible and easier to track stolen property.
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What are some examples of target hardening?
High fences, window bars, padlocks, alarms, security lights/guards, GPS (shows location of vehicle), neighbourhood watch scheme.
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What is designing out crime?
Designing estates or properties to reduce crime in that area. You design out crime to create defensible space.
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What are some examples of designing out crime?
No hidden alleys, well-lit, CCTV, police officer.
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What is defensible space?
A place around a property that can be watched, defended and protected from crime. You design out crime to create defensible space.
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Conservative Plate Boundary diagram
.
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Destructive Plate Boundary diagram
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Constructive Plate Boundary diagram
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Convection Currents diagram
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Burgess Model diagram
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

seismograph

Back

a machine for measuring the power of earthquakes

Card 3

Front

plate tectonics

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

constructive plate boundary

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

destructive plate boundary

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

Dragon02

I love this resource! Thanks Dragon02! lol

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