GCSE English Literature - Poetry Devices

HideShow resource information
Allusion
A brief reference to some person, historical event, work of art, or Biblical or mythological situation or character
1 of 13
Ambiguity
A word or phrase that can mean more than one thing, even in its context. Poets often search out such words to add richness to their work. Often, one meaning seems quite readily apparent, but other, deeper and darker meanings can be found.
2 of 13
Antithesis
The Contrast of two ideas, usually opposites. Example: Good/evil, light/dark, cruel/kind etc. This can occur in a sentence or line of poetry, or it can be a contrast between themes or ideas that are threaded throughout an entire novel.
3 of 13
Assonance
Repeated vowel sounds in words placed near each other, usually on the same or adjacent lines. These should be in sounds that are accented, or stressed, rather than in vowel sounds that are unaccented. Example: He’s a bruisin’ loser
4 of 13
Euphemism
An understatement, used to lessen the effect of a statement; substituting something innocuous for something that might be offensive or hurtful. Example: She is at rest. (meaning, she’s dead)
5 of 13
Hyperbole
An outrageous exaggeration used for effect. Example: He weighs a ton.
6 of 13
Metaphor
A direct comparison between two unlike things, stating that one is the other or does the action of the other. Example: He’s a zero OR Her fingers danced across the keyboard.
7 of 13
Oxymoron
A combination of two words that appear to contradict each other. Example: a pointless point of view; bittersweet
8 of 13
Personification
It is where things (and animals) are given human qualities or emotions. It is a technique used to create mood in a story. Example: The sunlight danced on the water; The wind whistled through the trees; The creatures screamed in the night
9 of 13
Repetition
The purposeful re-use of words and phrases for an effect. Sometimes, especially with longer phrases that contain a different key word each time, this is called parallelism. Example: I was glad; so very, very glad.
10 of 13
Rhyme
Words that have different beginning sounds but whose endings sound alike, including the final vowel sound and everything following it, are said to rhyme. Example: time, slime, mime
11 of 13
Semantic Field
A group of words that belong together - like sheep in a field. Example: words like cling, possessive, stay can be used to show the semantic field of possessiveness which is used to describe love.
12 of 13
Simile
A direct comparison of two unlike things using “like” or “as.” Example: He’s as dumb as an ox OR Her eyes are like comets.
13 of 13

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

A word or phrase that can mean more than one thing, even in its context. Poets often search out such words to add richness to their work. Often, one meaning seems quite readily apparent, but other, deeper and darker meanings can be found.

Back

Ambiguity

Card 3

Front

The Contrast of two ideas, usually opposites. Example: Good/evil, light/dark, cruel/kind etc. This can occur in a sentence or line of poetry, or it can be a contrast between themes or ideas that are threaded throughout an entire novel.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Repeated vowel sounds in words placed near each other, usually on the same or adjacent lines. These should be in sounds that are accented, or stressed, rather than in vowel sounds that are unaccented. Example: He’s a bruisin’ loser

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

An understatement, used to lessen the effect of a statement; substituting something innocuous for something that might be offensive or hurtful. Example: She is at rest. (meaning, she’s dead)

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar English Literature resources:

See all English Literature resources »See all AQA Anthology resources »