Formation Of Relationships

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  • Created by: Amy.P
  • Created on: 19-09-15 17:31
Who proposed the filter model?
Kerckhoff and Davis (1962)
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What is the filter model?
Relationships develop through three 'filters'. The 'field of availables' is gradually narrowed down to a small 'field of desirables' through these filters.
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What is the first filter?
Social/Demographic Variables - People tend to mix with others who are similar to them in several ways. Similarities make up a 'field' from which potential partners are chosen.
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What is the second filter?
Similarity of attitudes & values - if the couple share ideas/beliefs, communication should be easier and the relationship may progress. People with different attitudes, values and interests are filtered out.
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What is the third filter?
Complementarity of emotional needs - how well the two people fit together as a couple and meet each others needs.
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Suggest one supportive evaluation point for the filter model
It is a useful way to think about the factors which are influential in relationship development and when they might come into play. Filter model emphasises importance of demographic factors/similarity of attitudes.
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Suggest one criticism of the filter model
Division of relationships into stages fails to capture their fluid and dynamic nature. In real life, relationships flow seamlessly; some may develop faster and others slower than the filter model suggests.
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Who proposed the reward/need satisfaction theory?
Byrne and Clore (1970)
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What is the reward/need satisfaction theory?
We are attracted to people we find satisfying to be with. Most stimuli can be seen as rewarding or punishing; we are motivated to seek rewarding stimuli. Rewarding things tend to meet needs - mutual attraction occurs when they meet each others needs.
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How do the principles of operant conditioning apply to the reward/need satisfaction theory?
We are likely to repeat any behaviour that leads to a desirable outcome and avoid behaviours that lead to an undesirable outcome. We enter relationships because the presence of some individuals is directly associated with reinforcement.
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How does attraction occur through association?
We like people who are associated with pleasant events. If we meet someone when we are happy, we are more likely to like them. A neutral stimulus can become positively valued because of their association with a pleasant event.
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Describe a study that supports the reward/need satisfaction theory
Griffitt and Guay (1969), Sheldon (2011), Aron (2005)
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What is Hays (1985) criticism of the reward/need satisfaction theory?
The theory only explores the recieving of rewards. Hays found we gain satisfaction from giving as well as recieving.
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Describe one criticism of the reward/need satisfaction theory
Cultural bias, lack of mundane realism (laboratory study)
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Card 2

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What is the filter model?

Back

Relationships develop through three 'filters'. The 'field of availables' is gradually narrowed down to a small 'field of desirables' through these filters.

Card 3

Front

What is the first filter?

Back

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Card 4

Front

What is the second filter?

Back

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Card 5

Front

What is the third filter?

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