Fluoroscopes

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What does fluoroscopy produce?
Moving images
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How does it work?
By placing a patient between an x-ray source and a fluorescent screen.
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What is the process of fluoroscopy?
Different amounts of x-rays are absorbed as they pass through the body and the x-rays then hit the fluorescent screen which absorbs them.
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What happens once the x-rays have been absorbed by the fluorescent screen?
The screen fluoresces them to give off light to show a live image on a screen.
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Why is x-ray intensity important?
The image we see is due to different bits on the screen being exposed because of different intensities of x-rays.
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What happens when the x-rays are very intense?
The higher the x-ray intensity, the brighter the screen.
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What is an image intensifier?
These are used to increase the brightness of the screen which means a lower dose of x-rays has to be given to the patient.
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What does fluoroscopy help to do?
Using fluoroscopes can diagnose problems in the ways that organs are functioning.
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What is a contrast medium?
A patient is given a contrast medium which improves the contrast of the image seen, by enhancing soft tissue (x-rays pass easily through soft tissue)
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

How does it work?

Back

By placing a patient between an x-ray source and a fluorescent screen.

Card 3

Front

What is the process of fluoroscopy?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What happens once the x-rays have been absorbed by the fluorescent screen?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

Why is x-ray intensity important?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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