Exploring Human Geography 2

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: Sophie
  • Created on: 12-05-15 14:22

1. What is Hudsons main argument in The New Geography and The New Imperialism?

  • In the 1770's the modern form of 'New Geography' appeared to serve the interests of imperialism and colonialism in aspects of territorial, economic and militarism and the practice of race and class domination
  • In the 1570's the modern form of 'New Geography' appeared to serve the interests of imperialism and colonialism in aspects of territorial, economic and militarism and the practice of race and class domination
  • In the 1870's the modern form of 'New Geography' appeared to serve the interests of imperialism and colonialism in aspects of territorial, economic and militarism and the practice of race and class domination
  • In the 1970's the modern form of 'New Geography' appeared to serve the interests of imperialism and colonialism in aspects of territorial, economic and militarism and the practice of race and class domination
1 of 20

Other questions in this quiz

2. Which is not a feature of Jackson's Indentities?

  • Identities often assume a narrative form in the sense that individual biographies are emplotted within wider contexts.
  • Modern formations of identity are often said to be more complex than those in the past. It has become a reflective project rather than something one simply inherits or possesses.
  • Identities are often expressed through our relationships with particular material goods
  • Place based identities are also increasingly complex, shaped through forms of diasporic, transnational and globalised space.
  • There is the conceptual and methodological complexity involved in encountering the other of the same, let alone the other of the other
  • As traditional sources of identity, associated with work, family and religion, have warned, new forms of identity have emerged, around consumption issues
  • Identities are often expressed through material things like food and can be researched through various methods including the recording of life histories and other interview based methods.
  • Identities involve the most intimate aspects of our personal lives but are also related to wider notions of social inclusion and exclusion.
  • One useful way of understanding narrative identities is though the analysis of life histories, an approach that sets personal biographies in their wide relational context.

3. What is Hopkins key idea in Youthful masculinities: gender and generational relations?

  • There is evidence of two main discourses about the masculinities of young Muslim men – one that emphasizes patriarchy and aggression, the other effeminacy and academicism – and together they offer polarized perspectives of young Muslim men's masculin
  • Profane spatialities and temporalities are reconfigured into sacred topologies and how these seekers realise spiritual enlightenment through a reinhabited appropriation or articulation of the world

4. What was the key concept of North's, Scaling Alternative economic practices?

  • The growing number of local and complementary currencies that help people satisfy needs directly and constitute community differently
  • In Argentina, the currency was not localised, and the range of goods and services available was so significant that it enabled millions to survive an acute financial crisis.
  • Informal international financial networks that supply credit or gifts directly and democratize development funding, such as the migrant remittances that rival the size of foreign direct investment in developing countries - steady growth

5. Which is not a changing theme of Kearns and Moon in From medical to health geography: novelty, place and theory after a decade of change?

  • Critical health geography: a rapidly changing set of ideas and practices within human geography linked by a shared commitment to emancipatory politics within and beyond the discipline
  • Place- The objective has been to show that ‘places matter’ with regard to health, disease and health care.
  • Time- over time new diseases develop and time is also used to refer to the spread of diseases
  • Theory- The newness of the ‘coming out’ into theoretical awareness by health geographers- the social-theoretic context of health and of health-related subject matter

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Geography resources:

See all Geography resources »See all Geography resources »