Explanations for the success or failure of dieting

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  • Created by: jess
  • Created on: 24-05-14 16:57
Herman and Mack
restraint theory suggests that attempting not to eat may actually increase probability of overeating - it is the disinhibition of restraint that is the cause of overeating in restrained eaters
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Wardle and Beales
randomly assigned obese women to one of 3 groups for 7 weeks; restrained eating, exercise or non-treatment. Food intake was assessed under stressful conditions. Women in restrained eating group ate more than women in other two groups
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Boundary model - Herman and Polivy
explains failure of dieting in terms of greater distance between hunger and satiety in dieters → takes dieters longer to feel hungry and therefore more food to reach a state of satiety. Dieters have a self-imposed desired intake. Unlike non-dieters,
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Implications for obesity treatment
although restraint theory suggests that restraint leads to overeating → treatment of obesity recommends restraint as a solution to excessive weight gain
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Ogden
found that overeating may be a consequence of obesity if restraint is recommended as a treatment which refutes (disproves) restraint theory
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Ogden
although dieters and some anorexics report episodes of overeating, behaviour of restricting anorexics cannot be explained using this theory. If trying not to eat results in overeating, then how do anorexics manage to starve themselves?
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Role of denial
attempting to suppress a thought frequently has the opposite effect, making it even more prominent
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Wegner
suggests any attempt to suppress thoughts of forbidden foods only increases dieter's preoccupation with the very foods they are trying to deny themselves. Therefore as soon as food is denied it becomes more attractive
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Soetens et al
found that pots who suppressed thoughts about food also showed a rebound effect and were more likely to think about food after suppression. Might explain why denial of thoughts about food leaders to greater rather than less preoccupation with it
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Wegner
admits that 'ironic effects' observed in research were not significant
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Eurocentrism
led to an imposed etic, meaning that Western values are seen as the norm then unsuccessfully applied to other cultures
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Derived etic approach
eliminate culture bias in this area by using local psychologists and methodology
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cultural relativist approach
acknowledge similarities and differences that exist in dieting behaviours between cultures
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Park
found that Asian adults are more prone to obesity than Europeans. therefore research on success or failure of dieting behaviour based on Western theory would be limited to this group.
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Card 2

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randomly assigned obese women to one of 3 groups for 7 weeks; restrained eating, exercise or non-treatment. Food intake was assessed under stressful conditions. Women in restrained eating group ate more than women in other two groups

Back

Wardle and Beales

Card 3

Front

explains failure of dieting in terms of greater distance between hunger and satiety in dieters → takes dieters longer to feel hungry and therefore more food to reach a state of satiety. Dieters have a self-imposed desired intake. Unlike non-dieters,

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

although restraint theory suggests that restraint leads to overeating → treatment of obesity recommends restraint as a solution to excessive weight gain

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

found that overeating may be a consequence of obesity if restraint is recommended as a treatment which refutes (disproves) restraint theory

Back

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