Explaining female crime

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  • Created by: Megan
  • Created on: 27-04-15 21:52
What is the Functionalist Sex Role theory?
The idea that girls are socialised by their mothers to be expressive and caring which gives them access to a role model, boys tend to reject feminine models of behaviour and distance themselves from it by engaging in 'compensatory masculinity'
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How do boys engage in 'Compensatory compulsory masculinity' ?
through aggression and anti-social behaviour, which can slip over into acts of delinquency.
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According to COHEN what can the lack of an adult male role model do to boys?
means they are more likely to turn to all-male street gangs as a source of masculine identity, however in these groups status is earned through risk taking and delinquent acts.
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What are the two roles that PARSONS identifies in this sex role theory?
The male instrumental role of breadwinning and the female expressive role of socialisation
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How can the Sex role theory be criticised ?
Parsons assumes that because women have the biological capacity to bear children, they are best suited to the expressive role, thus although it tries to explain gender differences in crime in terms of socialisation it is ultimately based on biologica
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What 3 ways does HEIDERSOHN argue women are controlled?
In the home, In public, and at work
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How are women controlled in the home?
Women's domestic role imposes severe restrictions on their time and movement, and confines them to the house for long periods. Reducing opportunities to offend
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How are women controlled in public?
Through the threat of male violence against them, especially sexual violence. Heidersohn notes that sensationalist media reporting of rapes adds to womens fear
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How are women controlled at work?
Women's behaviour at work is controlled by male supervisors and managers. Sexual harassment is widespread and helps to keep women in their place. Also the glass ceiling prevents women from being in a position to commit fraud
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What is CARLEN's theory called? Whose work is it based on?
Control theory. It is based on the work of Hirschi and used to explain female crime.
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What did Hirschi argue about how humans act ?
Rationally and are controlled by being offered a deal; rewards in return for conforming to social norms.
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When did Hirschi argue people turn to crime? (rewards)
If they do not believe the rewards will be forthcoming, and it the rewards of crime appear greater than the risks
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What are the 2 deals Carlen argues lead working class women to conform?
1)The class deal 2)The gender deal
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What is the Class Deal?
Women who work will be offered material rewards, with a decent standard of living
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What is the gender deal?
Patriarchal ideology promises women material and emotional rewards from family life by conforming to the norms of a conventional domestic gender role
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When does Carlen argue that crime occurs?
If the rewards in the class and gender deals are not available or worth the effort.
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Overall, what does Heidersohns work show?
The many patriarchal controls that help prevent women from deviating
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Overall, what does Carlen's work show?
How the failure of patriarchal society to deliver the promised 'deals' to some women removes the controls that prevent them from offending.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

How do boys engage in 'Compensatory compulsory masculinity' ?

Back

through aggression and anti-social behaviour, which can slip over into acts of delinquency.

Card 3

Front

According to COHEN what can the lack of an adult male role model do to boys?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What are the two roles that PARSONS identifies in this sex role theory?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

How can the Sex role theory be criticised ?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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