Exam technique flashcards

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  • Created by: Elca
  • Created on: 16-03-15 17:57
Some questions ask you to pick out information
These questions test your ability to understand and interpret the text, select relevant information and order it into a coherent answer. You need to make sure you find all the relevant details and write about them clearly to get top marks.
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Read the text carefully
After you've read the exam question, look back through the text. As you read, underline information that answers the question.
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It's important to keep your answer focused
Select the parts of the text that answer the question best. You can use short quotes (use quotation marks), or explain what the writer says in your own words. Avoid quoting long chunks.
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P.E.E.D. stands for Point, Example, Explain, Develop
1)Make a point to answer the question you have been given 2)Give an example from the text (quote or description) 3)Explain how your example backs up your point 4)Effect on reader, writers intention, linking point to another part of text, or opinion
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Explain what your example shows about the text
Example will usually be a quote, but it can also be a reference e.g. description of pictures, font, layout or structure.
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Paragraphs are a good way to structure your answer
1-Could write a paragraph for every point you make, and could have a p.e.e.d. structure. 2-Could make 2 points that contrast or agree, useful when comparing 2 texts. 3-make one point and link together examples & different explanations.
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How you start each new paragraph is important
1)The beginning needs to show what the paragraph is about. Link it to key words in the question. 2)Link new point with previous paragraph. 3)Show you're moving on to another topic. 4)Introduce a comparison or contrast within a text.
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You need to look beyond what's obvious
1)Work out what a writer's attitude is. 2)Show you understand what the writer wants readers to think about. 3)Comment on how the writer tries to make the readers feel. 4)Write about why you think a piece was written. 5)Comment on any changes
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The examiner wants to hear your opinion
You can get marks for giving a thoughtful personal response. Make sure you focus on the text though.
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Examiners love alternative interpretations
Give more than one possible way of looking at a text.
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Inference means working things out from clues
Language, pictures, details.
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It's useful to work out the writer's tone
The language in the text can give away the writer's emotions and attitudes.
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You can show empathy with the writer
Make a link between the writer's experiences and your own. Don't give too much detail about yourself though.
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Quickly plan your answer before you start writing
Set your notes out in lists, side by side, to help you compare. Each set of notes matches a bullet point in the question.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

After you've read the exam question, look back through the text. As you read, underline information that answers the question.

Back

Read the text carefully

Card 3

Front

Select the parts of the text that answer the question best. You can use short quotes (use quotation marks), or explain what the writer says in your own words. Avoid quoting long chunks.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

1)Make a point to answer the question you have been given 2)Give an example from the text (quote or description) 3)Explain how your example backs up your point 4)Effect on reader, writers intention, linking point to another part of text, or opinion

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Example will usually be a quote, but it can also be a reference e.g. description of pictures, font, layout or structure.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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