Euthanasia

What is voluntary euthanasia?
When a person's death is directly caused by another person at their request and with their consent .
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What is passive euthanasia?
When a doctor or physician withdraws life support which indirectly causes death.
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What is non-voluntary euthanasia?
When a persons life is ended without their consent but with the consent of somebody representing their best interests.
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What is the slippery slope argument?
An argument that claims that if a rule is weakened, even for good reason, the what eventually follows if the rule is again weakened for good reasons will be highly undesirable.
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What is the sanctity of life principle?
The belief that human life is always valuable from the moment of conception until natural death. All innocent human life must be equally protected.
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What do people argue in support of the sanctity of life principle?
Life is a gift from god. An innocent life is always to be respected. Life is always to be loved and protected.
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What is the weak sanctity of life principle?
The belief that although human life is always valuable, there may be situations where it would cause more than harm than good to continue it.
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What are some reasons from the weak sanctity of life argument?
No-one has a duty to endure a life of extreme pain. Life is a gift, not a burden.
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What is the quality of life principle?
States that human life has to possess certain attributes in order to have value.
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What are Singer's five rational quality of life commandments?
Recognise that the worth of human life varies. Take responsibility for the consequences of your decision. Respect a person's desire to live or die. Bring children into the world if they are wanted. Do not discriminate on the basis of species.
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In the case of euthanasia, what judgements could a utilitarianist possibly take?
Total happiness judgement- happiness can't be increased, they can die.. Average happiness judgement- if there is a permanent decline- they can die. Higher qualities judgement- minimum standard of life.
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What is the liberal principle?
Developed by Mill, is that humans are the best judge of their own happiness, they should be given maximum freedom or liberty to live their lives as they consider appropriate.
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What is the doctrine of the double effect?
A person can do an action if: it is good in itself, the good is intended, the good is not produced by means of evil and there is good reason to permit the evil.
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What are some central issues of euthanasia?
Purity of intention. Arbitrariness. Ordinary and extraordinary needs. Proportionality and quality of life.
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What is Natural Law's view on euthanasia?
It undermines the social stability of society. It goes against the will of God. Goes against protecting innocent life. No refusal of treatment- must use ordinary but not extraordinary treatment
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What is Situation Ethic's view on euthanasia?
Pragmatism- has to be judged according to its merit. Relativism- each case has to be judged individually according to love. Positivism- no law states that life must be preserved. Personalism- principle of love and that it might be more loving to kill
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What is passive euthanasia?

Back

When a doctor or physician withdraws life support which indirectly causes death.

Card 3

Front

What is non-voluntary euthanasia?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What is the slippery slope argument?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What is the sanctity of life principle?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
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