Ethnocentrism

HideShow resource information
How can ethnocentrism be defined?
The bias that we have to see things from the point of ourselves and people like us.
1 of 8
What does ethnocentrism include about outgroups?
The tendency to under-value the outgroup's products. Increased rejection and hostility towards outgroup members.
2 of 8
What does ethnocentrism say about attitudes towards ingroups?
Tendency to over-value ingroup products. Increased liking for ingroup's members.
3 of 8
What is a negative about ethnocentrism and a positive point?
Negative is that it is prejudice. Positive is that it supports group cohesion.
4 of 8
What happens the more we like our group?
The more we dislike the other group.
5 of 8
What are the 2 sources of bias that ethnocentrism creates?
Researchers mainly only study their own culture. Researchers find it difficult to interpret behaviour and experience of people from other cultures.
6 of 8
What are examples of ethnocentric studies?
Kanner, Daly and Wilson, Johansson, Farrington, Ross, Castellow, Fisher, Janis and Feshbach.
7 of 8
What are examples of studies that are not ethnocentric?
Kohlberg, Holmes and Rahe, Yochelson and Samenow, Gottesman and Shields, ICD, Karp and Frank.
8 of 8

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What does ethnocentrism include about outgroups?

Back

The tendency to under-value the outgroup's products. Increased rejection and hostility towards outgroup members.

Card 3

Front

What does ethnocentrism say about attitudes towards ingroups?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What is a negative about ethnocentrism and a positive point?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What happens the more we like our group?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Psychology resources:

See all Psychology resources »See all Research methods and techniques resources »