Ethnicity and Achievement - Internal Factors

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Gillborn
Found that black pupils were quicker to be disciplined than others for the same behaviour
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Gillborn and Youdell
This is the result of teachers' 'racialised expectations'. Teachers expected black pupils to present more discipline problems and misinterpreted their behaviour as threatening or challenging to authority
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Bourne
Schools tend to see black boys as a threat and to label them negatively, leading eventually to exclusion
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Wright
Teachers held ethnocentric views: they took for granted that British culture and Standard English were superior. They assumed that Asian pupils would have a poor grasp of English and would leave them out of discussions
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Wright (Cont.)
Asian pupils also felt isolated when teachers expressed dissaproval of thier customs or mispronounced their names. They felt teachers saw them as a problem they could ignore.
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Fuller
A group of black girls were untypical because they were high achievers in a school where most black girls were placed in low streams. Instead of accepting negative labels, they channelled their anger into the pursuit of educational success
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Mac an Ghaill
A study of black and Asian pupils revealed that students who believed that teachers had labelled them negatively did not necessarily accept the label. They responded based on factors such as ethnic group, gender and nature of previous schools
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Sewell
Identified four different pupil responses (black males) to racist stereotyping
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The Rebels
Rejected the goals and rules from school and expressed their opposition through peer group membership, conforming to their own stereotype - 'macho lad'
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The Conformists
Largest group, keen to succeed, accepted the school's goals and had friends from different ethnic groups
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The Retreatists
Tiny minority of isolated individuals who were disconnected from both the school and black subcultures
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The Innovators
They were pro-education, but anti-school. They valued success, but did not seek the approval of teachers and conformed only as far as schoolwork itself was concerned
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Arnot
There is a media-inspired role of anti-school black masculinity, the 'ultra tough ghetto superstar, transmitted through rap lyrics and MTV videos.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

This is the result of teachers' 'racialised expectations'. Teachers expected black pupils to present more discipline problems and misinterpreted their behaviour as threatening or challenging to authority

Back

Gillborn and Youdell

Card 3

Front

Schools tend to see black boys as a threat and to label them negatively, leading eventually to exclusion

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Teachers held ethnocentric views: they took for granted that British culture and Standard English were superior. They assumed that Asian pupils would have a poor grasp of English and would leave them out of discussions

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Asian pupils also felt isolated when teachers expressed dissaproval of thier customs or mispronounced their names. They felt teachers saw them as a problem they could ignore.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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