Equus quotes

  • Created by: Brookevf
  • Created on: 11-02-18 13:53
"The doubts have been there for years, piling up steadily in this dreary place. It's only the extremity of this case that's made them active." Dysart Act I, Scene I
Dysart begins the play by immediately recounting his fears about his profession to the audience, but specifies that it was Alan's case in particular that brought these doubts to the surface. This is because Alan's was a very unconventional situation:
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"The only thing is, unknown to them, I've started to feel distinctly nauseous. And with each victim, it's getting worse." Dysart—Act I, Scene 5
Dysart's dream about being a Homeric priest and sacrificing children is clear symbolism for the work he does a a psychiatrist. With each and every client that passes through his office, he feels more and more like he is sacrificing children to make t
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"Bloody religion—it's our only real problem in this house, but it's insuperable; I don't mind admitting it." Frank Strang—Act I, Scene 7
Dysart's visit to the Strang household reveals some important clues to the mystery behind Alan's crime. Alan has been heavily exposed to religion and the Bible through his mother. Frank believes that this is the core of the problem, since many Bible
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"I couldn't take my eyes off them. Just to watch their skins. The way their necks twist, and sweat shines in the folds..." Alan Strang—Act I, Scene 13
This is the first time Alan describes his true attraction to horses. He focuses greatly on their physicality, describing them sexually. This shows that horses have more than just a spiritual appeal to Alan; he was initially attracted to them for the
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"Behold—I give you Equus, my only begotten son!" Alan Strang—Act I, Scene 14
This quote, taken from Alan's chanting in front of the horse photograph hanging in his room, confirms that Equus has become representative of Christ in Alan's mind. Equus is a Christlike figure in many ways, from his omnipresence in Alan's life to hi
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

Dysart's dream about being a Homeric priest and sacrificing children is clear symbolism for the work he does a a psychiatrist. With each and every client that passes through his office, he feels more and more like he is sacrificing children to make t

Back

"The only thing is, unknown to them, I've started to feel distinctly nauseous. And with each victim, it's getting worse." Dysart—Act I, Scene 5

Card 3

Front

Dysart's visit to the Strang household reveals some important clues to the mystery behind Alan's crime. Alan has been heavily exposed to religion and the Bible through his mother. Frank believes that this is the core of the problem, since many Bible

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

This is the first time Alan describes his true attraction to horses. He focuses greatly on their physicality, describing them sexually. This shows that horses have more than just a spiritual appeal to Alan; he was initially attracted to them for the

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

This quote, taken from Alan's chanting in front of the horse photograph hanging in his room, confirms that Equus has become representative of Christ in Alan's mind. Equus is a Christlike figure in many ways, from his omnipresence in Alan's life to hi

Back

Preview of the back of card 5

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