ENVS1 AQA Conservation in the UK

HideShow resource information
What are the 2 main aims of conservation in the UK?
Protect wildlife and protect landscape and countryside for its amenity/leisure value
1 of 20
What is a plagioclimax?
When an area is maintained by humans
2 of 20
Why is it especially important to conserve?
Important for population changes, urbanisation and development
3 of 20
What does DEFRA stand for and what are its aims?
Department for environment, food and rural affairs. Focuses on climate change, sustainability, and protection
4 of 20
What are the aims for natural england?
Promote a healthy natural environment, enjoyment of it and sustainable use.
5 of 20
What are Ramsar Sites and whats an example of one?
Wetland sites of international importance. e.g. Isle of Scilly
6 of 20
What are some examples of Designated protected areas?
NNR's, SPA's, SSSI's
7 of 20
What does NNR stand for and what are its aims?
National nature reserve. Protection and appropriate management
8 of 20
What does SPA stand for and what animal is it important for?
Special Protection Area. Important for birds.
9 of 20
What does SSSI stand for, what is it designated by and whats an example of it?
Site of Special Scientific Interest, Natural england, Isle of portland.
10 of 20
What are some examples of voluntary conservation organisations and what are their aims?
WWF (world wildlife fund): campaigns, public awareness, lobbying, education and funding. RSPB (royal society of protection of birds): UK organisation. Public awareness, lobbying, education, grants.
11 of 20
What is the environmental stewardship scheme and what are its aims?
Used in farming. Conserve wildlife, maintain and enhance landscape, promote public access and understanding.
12 of 20
What are two land uses that have produced valuable wildlife habitats and how have they done this?
Farming: grazing and field boundary maintanence-biological corridor. Hunting and fishing: maintenance of cover, provides cover for animals e.g. pheasants. Fishing maintains rivers
13 of 20
What has caused the loss of broadleaf woodland?
Population growth=less sustainable, clearance for farmland, need to maintain has decrease
14 of 20
What are the main ways of traditional woodland management?
Mature trees used for timber, coppicing and pollarding
15 of 20
What is coppicing?
Trees cut to ground level every 7-12 years. Regrow- produces thin branches for products e.g. fences
16 of 20
What is pollarding?
Tree cut to 1.8m. Protects new growth from grazing.
17 of 20
What is important of native woodland?
High biodiversity, recreational activities, reduce soil erosion, absorb CO2, sustainable supply of fuel, timber used for construction
18 of 20
How are wetlands threatened in UK?
Natural succession, urban expansion, drainage for farmland, excessive recreation pressure.
19 of 20
What are hedgerows important for and what are the reasons for their loss?
Biological corridors. Reasons for loss: fences, road widening, increase in size of fields.
20 of 20

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

What is a plagioclimax?

Back

When an area is maintained by humans

Card 3

Front

Why is it especially important to conserve?

Back

Preview of the front of card 3

Card 4

Front

What does DEFRA stand for and what are its aims?

Back

Preview of the front of card 4

Card 5

Front

What are the aims for natural england?

Back

Preview of the front of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar Environmental Science/Studies resources:

See all Environmental Science/Studies resources »See all Conservation in the UK resources »