English Language Timeline

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Celts 500BC-43BC
The Celts are the earliest inhabitants of the British Isles to leave a mark on our language. Celtic origins - London, Dover, Kent & River Thames.
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Romans 43BC-450AD
Romans invade and rule British Isles for over 400 years. ~ 200 Latin loanwords are inherited from the Romans. E.g. win (wine), candel (candle), belt (belt) and weall (wall).
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Anglo Saxons 449AD
Germanic tribes - Angles, Saxons and Jutes begin to arrive. Anglo Saxon dialects form the basis of the language we now call Old English. one third of Anglo-Saxon vocabulary survives into modern English, e.g. earth, house, food, sing, night and sleep
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St Augustine 597 AD
Christian missionaries arrive from the Continent. Throughout Europe, the language of the Church is Latin, and the missionaries inject hundreds of new Latin words into the English language. E.g. fork, spade, mass, school.
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Vikings 789AD
First Danish invasion of Britain. They remain in power in the North East until the late 900s, in an area then known as Danelaw. almost 2000 new words into the English vocabulary. Words derived from Norse include anger, awkward, cake, die, egg, etc.
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Normans 1066
The Normans invade. For ~ 300 years French is language spoken by most powerful people. Used in political documents, administration, and literature. Latin still the language of the church and of scholars. E.g crown, castle, court, parliament, army etc
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Card 2

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Romans invade and rule British Isles for over 400 years. ~ 200 Latin loanwords are inherited from the Romans. E.g. win (wine), candel (candle), belt (belt) and weall (wall).

Back

Romans 43BC-450AD

Card 3

Front

Germanic tribes - Angles, Saxons and Jutes begin to arrive. Anglo Saxon dialects form the basis of the language we now call Old English. one third of Anglo-Saxon vocabulary survives into modern English, e.g. earth, house, food, sing, night and sleep

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

Christian missionaries arrive from the Continent. Throughout Europe, the language of the Church is Latin, and the missionaries inject hundreds of new Latin words into the English language. E.g. fork, spade, mass, school.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

First Danish invasion of Britain. They remain in power in the North East until the late 900s, in an area then known as Danelaw. almost 2000 new words into the English vocabulary. Words derived from Norse include anger, awkward, cake, die, egg, etc.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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