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There is a lot of tension as each member of the family is found to have played a part in Eva's death.
The Setting and Lighting are very important. Priestley describes the scene in detail at the opening of Act 1, so that the audience has the immediate impression of a "heavily comfortable house."
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The Inspector himself adds drama: He controls the pace and tension by dealing with one line of enquiry at a time. Slowly the story of Eva's life is unravelled, like in a 'whodunnit'. He is in command at the end of Act I and the start of Act 2, and t
There are numerous changes in tone. For instance, Mr Birling's confidence is soon replaced - first by self-justification as he tries to explain his part in Eva's death, and then by anxiety. Timing of entrances and exits is crucial.
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For example, the Inspector arrives immediately after Birling has told Gerald about his impending knighthood and about how "a man has to look after himself and his own."
The ending leaves the audience on a cliff-hanger. In Act 3 the Birlings believed themselves to be off the hook when it is discovered that the Inspector wasn't real and that no girl had died in the infirmary.
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The ending leaves the audience on a cliff-hanger. In Act 3 the Birlings believed themselves to be off the hook when it is discovered that the Inspector wasn't real and that no girl had died in the infirmary.
This releases some of the tension - but the final telephone call, announcing that a real inspector is on his way to ask questions about the suicide of a young girl, suddenly restores the tension very dramatically. It is an unexpected final twist.
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Jekyll and Hyde
One of the ways in which 1984 develops is that we get to know Winston and share with him his experience of falling in love.
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There is also some dark humour in the sentence. In the reference to the clock striking thirteen we get a sense of the anarchy and disorder lurking in the story.
Like other techniques, setting creates atmosphere and tells us something about the characters, as well as representing the broader themes within a literary text.
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Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

There are numerous changes in tone. For instance, Mr Birling's confidence is soon replaced - first by self-justification as he tries to explain his part in Eva's death, and then by anxiety. Timing of entrances and exits is crucial.

Back

The Inspector himself adds drama: He controls the pace and tension by dealing with one line of enquiry at a time. Slowly the story of Eva's life is unravelled, like in a 'whodunnit'. He is in command at the end of Act I and the start of Act 2, and t

Card 3

Front

The ending leaves the audience on a cliff-hanger. In Act 3 the Birlings believed themselves to be off the hook when it is discovered that the Inspector wasn't real and that no girl had died in the infirmary.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

This releases some of the tension - but the final telephone call, announcing that a real inspector is on his way to ask questions about the suicide of a young girl, suddenly restores the tension very dramatically. It is an unexpected final twist.

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

One of the ways in which 1984 develops is that we get to know Winston and share with him his experience of falling in love.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
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