English language revision

HideShow resource information
  • Created by: Sarah
  • Created on: 19-01-16 09:17
Accent
pronunciation that indicates where a person is from geographically or socially.
1 of 14
Adjacency pairs
a two part exchange tha follows a predictable pattern.
2 of 14
Affective features
Utterance/paraliguistic features which are to do with expressing feelings.
3 of 14
Contraction
A reduced form often marked by an apostrophe in writing - e.g. can't = cannot. See also ELISION
4 of 14
Convergence
Process of accent change in which two speakers modify their accents in order to become more similar.
5 of 14
Deictic expressions
Common in speech. These have a 'pointing function' and refer in some way to the immediate context of an utterance (here, over there, these, those). They can also relate to time (now, then, yesterday, next week).
6 of 14
Dialect
The distinctive grammer and vocabulary which is associated with a regional or social use of a language.
7 of 14
Digressions
Deviations from the main theme or topic.
8 of 14
Discourse markers
Words and phrases which are used to signal the relationship and connections between utterance and to signpost that what is said can be followed by the listener or reader. E.g. 'first', 'on the other hand', 'now', 'what's more', so anyway', etc.
9 of 14
Divergence
An oppostie movement to convergence in which accents become further apart.
10 of 14
Ellision
The omission or slurring [eliding] of one or more sounds or syllables - e.g. gonna = going to; wannabe = want to be; wassup = what is up.
11 of 14
Ellipsis
The omission of part of a grammatical structure. For example diaogue. 'You going to the party?' - the verb 'are' is missed out. The resulting ellpsis conveys a more casual and informal tone.
12 of 14
False starts
Changes from one grammatical construction to another (before the initial construction has been completed) occur when speakers change their minds about what they want to say. i want to will you marry me. Also known as interrupted construction.
13 of 14
Fillers
Words and expressions that have little meanings but are often inserted into everyday speech. Examples include you know, like, sort of, I mean.
14 of 14

Other cards in this set

Card 2

Front

a two part exchange tha follows a predictable pattern.

Back

Adjacency pairs

Card 3

Front

Utterance/paraliguistic features which are to do with expressing feelings.

Back

Preview of the back of card 3

Card 4

Front

A reduced form often marked by an apostrophe in writing - e.g. can't = cannot. See also ELISION

Back

Preview of the back of card 4

Card 5

Front

Process of accent change in which two speakers modify their accents in order to become more similar.

Back

Preview of the back of card 5
View more cards

Comments

No comments have yet been made

Similar English Language resources:

See all English Language resources »See all Investigating language resources »